Wyoming

Last updated on 2014-01-17

Current CodeNone Statewide
Amendments / Additional State Code InformationThe International Conference of Building Officials (ICBO) Uniform Building Code, which is based on the 1989 Model Energy Code (MEC), may be adopted and enforced by local jurisdictions.

Approved Compliance ToolsCan use COMcheck

State Specific Research Impacts of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for Commercial Buildings in the State of Wyoming (BECP Report, Sept. 2009)
Approximate Energy EfficiencyLess energy efficient than 2003 IECC
Effective Date08/13/2008
Code EnforcementVoluntary
DOE DeterminationASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007: No
ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010: No

Energy cost savings for Wyoming resulting from the state updating its commercial and residential building energy codes in accordance with federal law are significant, estimated to be on the order of nearly $36 million annually by 2030.

Wyoming DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013


Current CodeNone Statewide
Amendments / Additional State Code InformationThe ICBO Uniform Building Code, which is based on the 1989 MEC, may be adopted and enforced by local jurisdictions.

Approved Compliance ToolsCan use REScheck

State Specific Research Impacts of the 2009 IECC for Residential Buildings in the State of Wyoming (BECP Report, Sept. 2009)
Approximate Energy EfficiencyLess energy efficient than 2003 IECC
Effective Date08/13/2008
Code EnforcementVoluntary
DOE Determination2009 IECC: No
2012 IECC: No

Energy cost savings for Wyoming resulting from the state updating its commercial and residential building energy codes in accordance with federal law are significant, estimated to be on the order of nearly $36 million annually by 2030.

Wyoming DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013


Code Change ProcessBoth Regulatory and Legislative
Code Change CycleReviewed
Timeline of CycleEvery 3 years

Adoption Process

Proposed changes to the state energy code may be submitted to the Wyoming Department of Fire Prevention and Electrical Safety (DFPES). The DFPES reviews proposed changes and submits its recommendations to the Governor-appointed Building Codes Council. Changes approved by the council are then adopted at the annual September meeting and become effective in January of the following year. Local adoption is required before energy provisions can be enforced.

Enforcement Process

Towns and counties that are established as local enforcement may, but are not required to, enforce an energy code at the local level. Currently, 20 towns and counties are established as local enforcement. As part of their normal building inspection process, the enforcement agency performs field inspections in these towns and counties. The DFPES has the authority to issue written interpretations.

Compliance Process

Compliance is determined by plan review and inspection by local code officials in jurisdictions that have adopted energy provisions as a part of their building code.

Background

The 1976 edition of the Uniform Codes was adopted in 1977. Prior to 1977, the State Fire Marshal's Office adopted and enforced the National Fire Prevention Agency standards. Since 1977, the state has adopted the current version of the Uniform Building Code consistent with its three-year publication cycle. The current energy provisions are contained in Appendix Chapter 53 of the 1991 Uniform Building Code, which references the 1989 Council of American Building Officials (CABO) Model Energy Code (MEC).