Previous Determinations

ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007

On July 20, 2011, DOE issued a final determination that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the code than the 2004 edition.

View the complete final determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on July 20, 2011.

View the complete preliminary determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on September 3, 2010.

State Certification

Certifications or Requests for Extension of Deadlines, with regard to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, will be due to DOE on July 20, 2013. All states have two years to adopt ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 or upgrade their existing commercial building codes to meet or exceed its requirements. However, as mentioned above, the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 final determination is being published before the two year deadline to file a certification for the 2007 positive determination; therefore, a state may file just one certification to address both determinations. The certification must include a demonstration that the provisions of the State's commercial building energy code regarding energy efficiency meet or exceed ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 and be filed by July 20, 2013.

Quantitative Analysis

A quantitative analysis of the estimated differences between the 2004 and 2007 editions of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 was performed support the final determination. The quantitative analysis of the energy consumption of buildings built to Standard 90.1-2007, as compared with buildings built to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, indicated national source energy savings of approximately 3.7% of commercial building energy consumption.

Detailed Textual Analysis

A detailed textual analysis of the estimated differences between the 2004 and 2007 editions of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 was performed to support the final determination.


ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004

On December 30, 2008, DOE issued a final determination that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the code than the 1999 edition.

View the complete final determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on December 30, 2008.

Quantitative Analysis

A quantitative analysis of the estimated differences between the 1999 and 2004 editions of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 was performed to support the final determination.

Detailed Textual Analysis

A detailed textual analysis of the differences between the 1999 and 2004 editions of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 was performed to support the final determination.


ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999

On July 15, 2002, DOE issued a final determination that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 would achieve greater energy efficiency in buildings subject to the code than the 1989 edition.

View the complete final determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on July 15, 2002.

Quantitative Analysis

A quantitative analysis of the estimated differences between the 1989 and 1999 editions of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 was performed to support the final determination.

Detailed Textual Analysis

A detailed textual analysis of the differences between the 1989 and 1999 editions of ASHRAE Standard 90.1 was performed to support the final determination.

2009 IECC

On July 19, 2011, DOE issued a final determination that the 2009 IECC would achieve greater energy efficiency in low-rise residential buildings than the previous IECC editions.

View the complete final determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on July 19, 2011.

View the complete preliminary determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on September 3, 2010.

State Certification

Certifications or Requests for Extension of Deadlines, with regard to the 2009 IECC, will be due to DOE on July 19, 2013. Each state has two years to certify that it has reviewed the provisions of its residential building code regarding energy efficiency and made a determination as to whether it is appropriate for the state to revise its residential building code to meet or exceed the 2009 IECC. If a state determines that it is not appropriate to revise its residential code to meet or exceed the 2009 IECC, the state is required to explain why in writing to the Secretary of Energy.


2006 IECC

On July 19, 2011, DOE issued a final determination that the 2006 IECC would achieve greater energy efficiency in low-rise residential buildings than the previous IECC editions. This determination was published simultaneously with the 2009 IECC Determination.

View the complete final determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on July 19, 2011.

View the complete preliminary determination notice that appeared in the Federal Register on September 3, 2010.

State Certification

Because the 2006 IECC determination was issued at the same time as the 2009 IECC determination, each state is not required to certify that it has reviewed the provisions of its residential building code regarding energy efficiency and made a determination as to whether it is appropriate for the state to revise its residential building code to meet or exceed the 2006 IECC.

2006 IECC Determination Technical Support Document — This report documents an analysis of the impacts on energy efficiency of the differences between the 2003 and 2006 IECC editions.

Note: DOE prepared a technical support document (TSD) for the 2006 IECC determination and not for the 2003 and 2009 IECC determinations for the following reasons. The 2006 IECC involved an extensive change in the format of the code compared to the 2003 IECC. In addition, the changes in the format to the 2006 IECC reduce energy efficiency in some cases and increase energy efficiency in others. DOE deemed that its analysis to determine whether energy efficiency was improved in the 2006 IECC would be better addressed in a TSD than in a Federal Register Notice. For the 2003 IECC determination, there were very few changes from the 2000 IECC; therefore, no TSD was needed. These changes are discussed directly in the Federal Register Notice. The 2009 IECC involves a substantial number of changes to energy efficiency, but nearly all these changes are clear improvements that will reduce energy use. Therefore, highly detailed calculations are not needed to determine whether energy efficiency is improved in the code, and these changes are discussed in the Federal Register Notice rather than a separate TSD.