Model Policies

Law requires upgrades to meet the NYC energy conservation code in buildings 50,000 square feet and greater by 2025.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Energy Conservation Ordinances and Mandatory Upgrades, Retro-commissioning
State: New York

State buildings should lead by example in energy efficiency. New construction and renovations of state-owned buildings must exceed the state energy code by at least 20% and should use energy modeling during the design process. Energy usage and costs are managed in a state-developed database, Enterprise Energy Management System.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Exceeding the Code
State: New Hampshire

"Prior to the sale of an existing residential structure, all toilets must be retrofitted with high efficiency toilets that meet the most recent requirements of the EPA Water Sense program. All city buildings with 5,000 square feet or more and all commercial buildings with 10,000 square feet or more must attain a LEED rating of silver. Select city buildings are required to achieve a gold rating. Commissioning is required for city buildings as a prerequisite for LEED. The energy performance and CO2 emissions for green buildings must be calculated to ensure that the structure exceeds the California Code by 15%."

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Exceeding the Code, Green Building
State: California

Law requires that commercial buildings, including additions and remodels, must exceed ASHRAE 90.1 or the 2006 IECC energy requirements by at least 30%.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Exceeding the Code
State: Colorado

The "Stretch Code," an appendix to the Massachusetts state code, is a voluntary option for both residential and commercial buildings to achieve higher levels of energy efficiency than the 2009 IECC code. Adherence to the stretch code could result in 20% to 35% better energy efficiency in residential structures, and 20% better energy efficiency in commercial buildings when compared to the existing code.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Exceeding the Code
State: Massachusetts

All new state-leased buildings must be built as high-performance buildings and exceed the IECC most recently adopted by at least 20%. High-performance building standards will be adopted by the state department and apply to any structure purchased with state money, located at a state institution, or owned by a state agency.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Exceeding the Code
State: Montana

New state construction must exceed the energy conservation provisions of the Oregon State building code by 20% or more. In addition, the 2007 Oregon Legislature passed HB2620, which requires that public entities spend 1.5% of the total contract price of a public improvement contract for new construction or major renovation of a public building on solar energy technology. The SEED guidelines were updated October 1, 2010, to include changes made to the 2010 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Exceeding the Code
State: Oregon

This bill involves ENERGY STAR benchmarking for commercial buildings at time of sale, lease, or financing of the whole building. It requires disclosure to transactional counterparties. It will be phased in over 2 years beginning in 2011.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: California

As of 2009, all commercial buildings over 10,000 square feet and residential units adding one or more dwelling units must complete a green building checklist. Commercial buildings over 10,000 square feet must complete an energy analysis (recommended for multi-family residential).

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Green Building
State: California

An annual ENERGY STAR benchmarking must be performed for commercial buildings 10,000 square feet and greater and disclosed annually via a public website. The ordinance requirements will be phased in over 3 years (beginning 2011) based on building size. In addition, ASHRAE level II audits are required for commercial buildings 50,000 square feet and greater and ASHRAE level I audits are required for buildings 10,000 square feet to 49,999 square feet. These audits are required once every 5 years. The initial compliance schedule is still in progress. Results are reported to the city. There are exemptions for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design Existing Building (LEED ED) certification (Green Building rating system for existing buildings) or multiple ENERGY STAR labels.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: California

Voluntary rules on ENERGY STAR benchmarking developed by the Maine Public Utilities Commission. 

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: Maine

Law requires that, on or after January 1, 2013, an owner or operator of a privately owned commercial building with an interior space of more than 10,000 square feet disclose energy benchmarking information; providing that a purchaser or lessee that does not receive an energy benchmark disclosure statement has the right to rescind a contract for sale or lease within a specified period; utility data support; etc.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: Maryland

All publicly owned or leased facilities are audited, and a baseline emissions inventory is established. The city commits to a 10% reduction in energy use within 5 years and 15% by 2020. R-38-06 also requires a green building design checklist and green building fact sheet for all private building permit applications to raise awareness of green building standards. New public facilities must have minimum standard of silver certification.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Green Building
State: Maryland

Buildings owned by the state or occupied by a state agency must record utility bills in an effort to track the amount of energy used in each building and buildings of like construction. Incentives for reducing energy consumption are required.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Incentive
State: Nevada

This law addresses annual ENERGY STAR benchmarking for commercial and multi-family buildings 50,000 square feet and greater. Annual disclosure to a public website is required. The law is being phased in over 3 years with city-owned buildings first, then commercial, then multi-family. The NYC Dept. of Buildings is in rulemaking.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: New York

Landlords and sellers must disclose the energy performance of buildings to renters/buyers. Commercial buildings must also disclose energy usage data to the EPA and State Department of Energy. Violations are subject to civil penalties. Additionally, buildings and homes meeting energy efficiency criteria may be eligible for property tax exemption.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Incentive
State: Oregon

Ordinance proposed on ENERGY STAR benchmarking for commercial and multi-family buildings 20,000 square feet and greater.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Green Building
State: Oregon

All buildings must comply with state energy and building codes and must prove compliance through either prescriptive, performance, or REScheck methods. An energy certificate must be attached to an electrical board in the building.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: Rhode Island

Home Energy Audits

Effective June 1, 2009, residences with four or fewer units, including all single-family homes, must complete an energy audit prior to the sale of the property and provide a copy of the results of the audit to prospective purchasers. A range of exemptions are available, including for homes built within 10 years of the sale date, all condominiums or voluntary participation in some Austin Energy Utility programs. Audits are valid for 10 years.\

Multi-family Energy Audits and Upgrades

Apartment buildings greater than 10 years old must have an energy audit by June 1, 2011, while buildings less than 10 years old are required to perform an audit within 10 years of the completion of construction. The results of the audit must be posted within the building and provided to prospective tenants and buyers. Additionally, "high energy-use" properties consuming more than 150% of the average multi-family energy use...

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: Texas

Energy audits are required for all residential and multi-family homes after construction and before homes are sold. Audits are good for 10 years. Disclosure of the energy audit results is mandatory and in the case of multi-family homes, must be posted in specified locations for tenants to access. In cases where energy usage exceeds 150% of average homes, the owner is given 18 months to conduct retrofits.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: Texas

This bill proposes to requirethe seller or agent to complete a statement of energy performance at the time a commercial or residential building or unit is offered for sale; to inform potential buyers of their right to obtain the statement; and to supply the statement to a buyer prior to any such sale.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: Vermont

This consumer education plan proposes a benchmark assessment of energy use in both residential and commercial buildings, partnership with ENERGY STAR, and education for customers, students, and the general public.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: Virginia

Virginia Beach is creating an Energy Improvement Plan, which will include a "Green Fleet" program that requires all new buildings be LEED certified. Energy audits will be performed on selected buildings. Net metering and energy audits are encouraged for residential structures.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Green Building, Netmetering and Submetering Policies
State: Virginia

This bill requires ENERGY STAR benchmarking for commercial buildings at time of sale, lease or financing as well as disclosure to transactional counterparties. It will be phased in over 2 years beginning in 2011. It also requires utility data support. Qualifying utilities shall maintain records of the energy consumption data of all non-residential and qualifying public agency buildings to which they provide service and shall upload the energy consumption data for the accounts specified by the owner or operator for a building to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's ENERGY STAR portfolio manager.

In addition, state agencies cannot lease or renew space in a building with less than a "75" on the ENERGY STAR scale. SB 5854 was effective in 2010.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: Washington

The CAEA requires the energy performance of large commercial buildings (over 50,000 SF) and all public buildings to be rated with ENERGY STAR software and disclosed on a public website. To rate energy performance, utility data is collected for 1 year and then reported to the District Department of the Environment via ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager, a free tool from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. 

Beginning in 2010, public buildings of at least 10,000 SF were rated with ENERGY STAR and disclosed online via a publicly-available database.

For commercial buildings, owners are given a 1 year grace period between the reporting of their energy performance and the publication of their scores on the public website. Energy data must be first reported to the District Department of the Environment by the...

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: District of Columbia

This bill requires annual ENERGY STAR benchmarking for commercial and multi-family buildings and disclosure to the city. It phases in over 2 years beginning in 2011. It also requires utility data support. The Department of Planning is in rulemaking.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure
State: Washington

In addition to the state energy goals of reducing fossil fuel usage by 15% by 2015 and increasing the total renewable energy use to 25%, the Next Generation Energy Act requires utilities to provide technical assistance for all residential and commercial projects that incorporate green building practices in their construction.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Green Building, Incentive
State: Minnesota

Electric sub-metering is required for all tenant spaces 10,000 square feet and greater in buildings 50,000 square feet and greater by 2025. Owners must provide monthly energy consumption reports to each sub-metered tenant.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Lighting Upgrades, Netmetering and Submetering Policies
State: New York

Initiates a program that allows net-metering, which is the difference between the amount of electricity supplied to a customer and how much electricity the customer feeds back to the electric grid.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Netmetering and Submetering Policies
State: Virginia

The 2009 Seattle Energy Code requires buildings 20,000 ft2 or larger to collect energy usage data for the whole building daily, at a minimum. Flow meters and current censors are permitted for submetering. Separate submetering is required for HVAC systems, lighting, plugs, electrical energy, and heat content. Energy usage must be displayed in a visible, accessible area and contain information regarding daily energy use, average and peak energy use for the previous day, average use from the same day the previous year, and the total energy demand for the previous 12 months. The code also includes compliance requirements, including mandatory energy credits.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Netmetering and Submetering Policies
State: Washington

This program focuses on whole community, including modification of building and zoning codes, creation of green building standards, incentives for green building certification, and city commitments. Changes to the general plan and zoning, requirements for LEED municipal buildings, and adoption of the 2006 IECC will result in mandatory changes, while incentives to promote LEED in private commercial developments encourage voluntary changes.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: Arizona

This law establishes a set of rules for creating a sustainable construction act. It also requires that state-funded buildings exceed ASHRAE 90.1.-2004 by 30% when it is determined by a life cycle cost analysis that payback will not exceed 10 years. All major facilities must achieve a 15% water use reduction based on the Energy Policy Act of 1992. ENERGY STAR designation is encouraged. Buildings should account for siting, local and renewable source use, and pollutant discharge.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building
State: Georgia

State agencies should reduce the amount of energy consumed and the environmental impact of state operations. All agencies are responsible for producing a Strategic Energy Plan (SEP) that includes provisions for collecting and monitoring energy use data. LEED is one of several choices of tools to use in green building. SEPs should also cover preferred-purchasing guidelines, the use of bio-based products when available, green vehicle fleets, the establishment of recycling programs with agencies, energy consumption reduction strategies, etc.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building
State: Arkansas

Green building requirements added to San Mateo Municipal Code for residential and commercial structures. Green building requirements include resource conservation, waste reduction and diversion, and increased energy efficiency. Compliance requirements include planning applications, permit review, compliance during construction, and a final determination of compliance upon completion. In effect on January 1, 2010.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building
State: California

The Private Development Green Building Ordinance requires a Green Point Rating System (GPRS) be used during new construction and remodeling of residential dwellings (single- and multi-family). Commercial buildings must include all items on the city of Hayward Checklist for Private Non-Residential Development before a certificate of occupancy will be awarded.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building
State: California

Commercial buildings must be in compliance with LEED's minimum energy prerequisite. Residential homes (3 stories or less) must be in compliance with GreenPoint Rated's minimum energy prerequisites. Residential high rises (4 stories or more) must demonstrate energy usage to ensure compliance with 2009 GreenPoint Rated guidelines. Home Energy Rating System (HERS) ratings will be required for all multi-family renovations prior to attaining a building permit as of January 1, 2011.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building
State: California

Palo Alto's mandatory program addresses residential and non-residential projects. Residential projects achieve Build it Green/Green Points Certification and are certified by Build it Green/Green Points Rater, or verified by the city, depending on project size. Non-residential projects must achieve LEED certification; smaller projects are verified by the city, larger must be registered and verified with USGBC.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building
State: California

This mandatory program focuses on energy and water efficiency, as well as recycling and reuse of building materials. Level of compliance is tied to the square footage of the residence. A commercial program is under development. 

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building, Water and Landscaping
State: Colorado

The index is a tool used to assess all planned unit developments (PUD), PUD amendments, final plats, major special use permits, and zone changes. The points-based index addresses: site and location, connections and uses, transportation, and resource efficiency. Each project must meet a pre-determined point threshold for approval. The SCI promotes mixed use, transit-oriented, new urbanist, form-based, pedestrian- and environmentally-friendly, clustered, infill development, and is a required finding for new development proposals reviewed by the Board of County Commissioners.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building
State: Colorado

Fort Collins' Green Building Program was created to help align Fort Collins with the community's goals for carbon emission reduction, energy efficiency, and water conservation. The city has developed green building amendments for commercial and residential projects that will increase resource, energy and water efficiency and conservation, indoor environmental quality, outdoor environmental quality, operations and maintenance education for the building owner (residential) and commissioning (commercial).

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building, Water and Landscaping
State: Colorado

With the 2010 Ordinance 1331, the city of Telluride adopted a green building program that applies to all new construction, additions, and remodels of commercial, residential, and multi-family homes and requires compliance with energy and green building codes. The city has created the Telluride Energy Mitigation Program (TEMP) that requires all excessive exterior energy use, larger homes, and heated garages mitigate or offset the impacts of the additional energy requirements by either using an on-site renewable energy source or making a payment in lieu. This includes outdoor pools, heated garages, and spas/ hot tubs. An energy code review fee equal to 20% of the project's building permit fee must be paid to cover the costs associated with verifying compliance. Funds from the energy code review and TEMP program will be used on town projects. Violating any portion of the ordinance will result in a misdemeanor, punishable upon conviction by a penalty as set in...

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: Colorado

The "Stamford Cool & Green 2020" incoporates energy efficiency, renewable energy, solid waste/recycling, transportation, and community. Highlights include:

The 10% Challenge is a voluntary program to help households and businesses reduce greenhouse gas emissions by at least 10%.  The 10% Challenge provides the tools and the information necessary to conserve energy at home and work.

Establish a list of the “top 10” green items or services that are routinely purchased by the city, or which represent a significant cost savings.  Develop a policy to ensure that the green items chosen are purchased.  General areas for consideration shall be cleaners, computers, fleets, office electronics, and paint. 

...

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building, Lighting Upgrades
State: Connecticut

All new construction and renovation of state buildings must follow the guidelines of LEED or other green building rating systems, including Green Globes and the Florida Green Building Coalition standards. The bill requires the same of the following public entities in the state of Florida entering design after July 1, 2008: counties, municipalities, school districts, water management districts, state universities, community colleges, and Florida state courts. The bill further requires that all new leases of state-occupied office space must meet ENERGY STAR.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building
State: Florida

Charlotte County Board of Commissioners adopted a Green Building Ordinance establishing a Green Building Program. New residential projects and residential renovation projects that are certified under the LEED for Homes Rating System and new commercial projects, commercial renovation projects that are certified under the appropriate LEED Rating System, and land developments that are certified under the LEED for Neighborhood Development Rating System, are all eligible to participate in this program. All program participants are eligible for fast-track permitting and will be included in a marketing program to promote green building in Charlotte County. The County Board may adopt at a later date a resolution providing monetary incentives for green building, if County funds allow. Also, once the County Comprehensive Plan is adopted, the County Board will consider offering additional incentives including density bonuses for projects that are certified at LEED Silver and...

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: Florida

The Tampa Fast Track Review Checklist is not a rating system. It is a means whereby city staff can determine if a project meets certain sustainability criteria as to warrant a faster plan review. Some requirements include:

New and renovated municipal buildings 5,000 ft2 or larger must achieve LEED Silver.

Commercial buildings 5,000 ft2 or larger are required to comply with a third-party rating system, LEED or FGBC.

Residential and commercial buildings less than 5,000 ft2 must meet six requirements.

Other systems are evaluated on a case-by-case basis. Grants are available to help with permitting costs.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: Florida

All new commercial buildings, including offices, multiple residence structures, industrial buildings and senior citizen centers greater than 20,000 ft2, must achieve a LEED certification. All municipal or city-owned buildings, regardless of size, must also achieve a LEED certification.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building
State: Georgia

Chicago requires that several green building strategies be used in city owned or funded buildings, including LEED certification, green roofs, and effective storm water management.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building, Water and Landscaping
State: Illinois

The city of Evanston requires that all commercial, multi-family, and city-owned or city-financed buildings over 10,000 square feet receive a LEED Silver rating or higher. All commercial, multi-family, and city-owned buildings seeking interior renovations must either receive a LEED-Commercial Interiors (CI) certification of Silver or higher or incorporate elements of thec ity of Evanston Sustainable Building Measures for Interior Renovations (ESBMIR). Projects less than 5000 square feet must integrate three ESBMIR measures, projects 5,000 to 20,000 square feet must integrate five measures, and projects over 20,000 square feet must incorporate seven measures.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building
State: Illinois

Kansas City requires that the design, construction, and operation of all new facilities and renovations in buildings with at least 5,000 square feet be built to the LEED Gold rating or higher of the most recent version of the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED standard.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building
State: Missouri

Greensburg's Sustainable Comprehensive Master Plan was created in an effort to rebuild Greensburg after a devastating earthquake in 2007. The Master Plan provides a framework for the rebuilding of Greensburg based around the principles of environmental, economic, and social sustainability. As part of the plan, all municipal buildings must be constructed to LEED platinum standards and exceed the energy efficiency baseline code by 42%. The city also has a windfarm that produces 100% renewable energy for the town. It is voluntary for residential homes to comply with the ICC-700 National Green Building Standard. The Master Plan incorporates all aspects of green building- from site selection to walkability to landscaping to hazard mitigation- every element is covered.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Exceeding the Code, Green Building, Water and Landscaping
State: Kansas

Newly constructed or extensively modified commercial buildings and multi-family residential structures with more than 10,000 square feet must be built to the Green Building Standards of the City of Baltimore. Compliance with the Baltimore Green Buildings Law requires, at minimum, either two earned stars via the standards option or a U.S. Green Building Council LEED Silver rating.

Focus: Commercial, Multi-Family
Category: Green Building
State: Maryland

The Green Building Tax Credit provides a 25% tax credit for new buildings that achieve LEED Silver certification or equivalent, a 50% tax credit for new buildings that achieve LEED Gold certification or equivalent, and a 75% tax credit for new buildings that achieve LEED Platinum certification or equivalent, for a period of 5 consecutive years. This tax credit only applies to property that is principally used for business, commercial, or industrial purposes.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: Maryland

The Leading by Example Program is designed to provide feedback to and support efforts across the state to reduce environmental impact. State-owned buildings must reduce energy consumption by 20% using fiscal year 2004 as a baseline. All new construction must meet the Massachusetts LEED Plus green building standard.

Focus: Commercial, Multi-Family
Category: Green Building
State: Massachusetts

This high profile, voluntary program offers recognition for high performing, comprehensively sustainable buildings.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building
State: New Mexico

Green buildings achieving LEED-NC certification in the city of Columbus, Ohio are eligible for LEED reimbursement ranging from a minimum of the certification fee to a maximum of three times the certification fee. All eligible projects must receive certification from the USGBC and credit for at least 8 of 12 essential LEED-NC credits designated by the city. The funds for certification reimbursement are available through the Green Columbus Fund, a $1 million grant program to encourage green building and brownfield redevelopment.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: Ohio

The 2009 update of the city's policy reflects an energy efficiency improvement from the original LEED Gold requirement for all city-owned projects. The new construction and major remodels of city-owned facilities must register with the U.S. Green Building Council and certify at the Gold level, in addition to specific criteria for recycling, water conservation, energy conservation and onsite generation, commissioning, and cool roofs. Tenant Improvements and Leased Spaces must register and certify at LEED Commercial Interiors (CI) Silver, or use the Bureau of Planning and Sustainability's Green Tenant Improvement Guide. Existing Buildings must pursue LEED EB Silver, with specific criteria for roof replacements. Additional standards are in place for historic buildings and operations and maintenance.

Focus: Commercial, Multi-Family
Category: Green Building
State: Oregon

"Nashville has a voluntary green certificate program, offers density bonus incentives in designated neighborhoods, and has mandatory requirements for municipal buildings. To receive a green certificate of occupancy, commercial buildings must earn LEED Certified, specifically requiring WEc3.1 (20% water use reduction); residential buildings must submit proof of LEED or EarthCraft Homes certification. In the downtown area, development in the Central Business District is eligible to increase the Floor Area Ratio (FAR) cap from 15 to 17 if the project achieves LEED Silver. Projects in this district benefit from a FAR of 19 if the project achieves LEED Gold. In the South of Broadway (SoBro) neighborhoods, developments are eligible to increase the FAR cap from 5 to 7 if the project achieves LEED Silver. Projects in these neighborhoods benefit from a FAR cap of 9 if LEED Gold is achieved. All public and publicly-funded building projects of 5,000 ft2 or greater (or...

Focus: Commercial, Multi-Family, Residential
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: Tennessee

The city of Austin has numerous green building provisions within the city building code, with requirements that vary according to location, zoning designation and building type. The building standards rely on the Austin Energy Green Building Rating system and the LEED certification system as metrics. In some cases, developers have the option of achieving compliance under either of the two systems. Under the Austin Energy Green Building Rating System, buildings are awarded up to five stars depending on the number and breadth of green building elements that are incorporated into the design. In terms of energy efficiency, rated buildings are designed to exceed the Austin Energy Code.

Focus: Commercial, Multi-Family, Residential
Category: Exceeding the Code, Green Building
State: Texas

The minimum standards for the commercial green building program include: 100% of all roofs must comply with the ENERGY STAR Cool Roof Program; shade trees shall be planted along the front of the building to create a pedestrian environment and to mitigate heat; potable water for landscape must be reduced by at least 50%; all concrete and metal must be recycled from construction and demolition waste; and education programs concerning commercial green building initiatives will be hosted. 

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building, Water and Landscaping
State: Texas

All residential and commercial structures designed to achieve green building certification will receive priority plan review. Commercial buildings must be designed to achieve, at a minimum, LEED silver, which residential homes must be designed to achieve, at a minimum, LEED Homes silver, Nation Green Building Standards (NGBS) silver, Earthcraft select status, or Green Globes (3 to 5 green globes).

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: Virginia

All city buildings over 5,000 square feet, new or renovated, will meet the LEED Silver rating whenever technically possible. LEED building will be promoted in the private sector, and city staff will continue to be educated in green building practices.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building
State: Washington

Residential, commercial, and mixed structures are eligible to apply for participation in Clark County's pilot program for sustainable development. The goal of the project is to promote and encourage the incorporation of elements of the Living Building Challenge into buildings and communities. The program will allow deviations from the current code requirements that might otherwise prevent sustainable buildings from being built. Applications will be accepted for 5 years or until six projects have been selected.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building
State: Washington

All new city-owned buildings with adequate resources over 5,000 square feet must meet the LEED Silver certification requirements. For buildings and renovations without adequate resources, the city will implement other cost-effective green building practices. The city will encourage the use of LEED and other green building practices in private buildings through code development, building standards, and land use regulations.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building
State: Washington

In a broad partnership of city resources (Washington State Department of Energy, Puget Sound Electric and others), Seattle provides customized green building education, early design guidance, technical assistance, incentives, and recognition of sustainable building. They recognize and support a variety of third party verification programs including Built Green and LEED. They have published a series of green guides for various project types and resource lists. The city not only provides extensive information on external incentives, it also provides incentives such as FAR bonuses in certain areas, expedited review service, etc.

Focus: Commercial, Multi-Family, Residential
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: Washington

Ordinance 04411 adds the Green Building Program to county building regulations. It also establishes program goals, outlines rating requirements, and expedites permit processing for GreenPoint Rated or LEED homes.

Focus: Commercial, Multi-Family, Residential
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: California

Any building permit or water hook-up shall be issued or granted only if the applicant demonstrates that the water demands created by the use of the structures for which the building permit, water hook-up or development approval is sought will be entirely offset (Ord. No. 2003-36 § 11). In all cases, the amount of water offset by retrofits shall be equal to or greater than the estimated water usage of the proposed building, as determined by the annual water budget procedures.

Focus: Commercial, Multi-Family, Residential
State: New Mexico

The following requirements are effective July 1, 2010: All new or substantially renovated residential structures must comply with the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA) New York ENERGY STAR-Labeled Home Program. At a minimum, homes less than 3500 ft2 must attain a Home Energy Rating System (HERS) rating of 84; homes with 3501 to 4500 ft2 must attain a HERS rating of 87; homes with 4501 to 6500 ft2 must attain a HERS rating of 90; and homes over 6500 ft2 must attain a HERS rating of 93. All commercial and municipal buildings, regardless of size, must meet the ""designed to ENERGY STAR"" requirements. Owners of residential homes and commercial buildings that meet LEED requirements are eligible for a refund of 0.25% of the costs of construction

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building, Incentive
State: New York

The original ordinance was signed in 2000, with additional definitions added in 2006 for clarification. Gilbert's water conservation ordinance addresses irrigation water use in new residential developments and commercial properties. Water-intensive landscaping in common areas of a new single family or multi-family development shall not exceed 10% of the total landscapable area in the new development. If reclaimed water is used on such common areas, the town's reclaimed water incentive rate shall be charged. If only reclaimed water is used on common areas, the amount of water-intensive landscaping may increase to 50% of the total landscapable area. In model homes, the following restrictions apply: (a) The combined water-intensive landscaping and water features of model homes in new single-family developments shall not exceed 20% of the landscapable area; (b) Water-intensive landscaping shall be located only where it is functionally useful, such as in play areas or...

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Water and Landscaping
State: Arizona

All irrigation systems must be installed with a rainwater sensor that will override the system to ensure landscapes are not being watered in the rain. Violators will be charged a fine that will increase with each day of offense, up to $400 per day.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Water and Landscaping
State: North Carolina

Directly watering impervious surfaces such as driveways and sidewalks, as well as overwatering to the extent that water cannot be absorbed into the soil, will result in a fine of that will increase with each day of offense, up to $400 per day.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Water and Landscaping
State: North Carolina

Residential and commercial buildings with even numbered addresses are allowed to water Tuesday, Thursday, and Saturday. Residential and commercial buildings with odd numbered addresses are allowed to water Wednesday, Friday, and Sunday. Watering by hand with a can or hose is allowed any day of the week, as long as the hose or can is physically held by a person. Residential fines can be up to $500. Commercial fines can range from $250 to $2,000.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Water and Landscaping
State: North Carolina

Incentives are provided to utility customers (residential and commercial) in purchasing renewable energy services. Energy audits are required before funding is given.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Energy Audits, Benchmarking, and Disclosure, Incentive
State: Delaware

Any county, city, or town in Montana that has enacted an energy efficiency program may include voluntary standards for new commercial construction that promote energy conservation and provide incentives for following the standards. Incentives can be greater than those offered by the state building code.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Incentive
State: Montana

Chicago has several green roof incentive programs, including the Green Roof Improvement Fund, a 50% grant match for the cost of placing a green roof on an existing building located in the Central Loop TIF District up to a maximum grant amount of $100,000 per project, and the Green Roof Grant Program, which awards $5,000 grants for green roof projects on residential and small commercial projects. In addition, the city of Chicago currently requires all new, near-flat roofs meet the U.S. EPA ENERGY STAR cool roof standards as part of the Chicago Energy Conservation Code. A cool roof uses special materials to reflect the sun's heat instead of warming the building below. The city's Cool Roofs Grant Program provides up to $6,000 each to help residents and small business owners install roofs that meet or exceed the cool roof standards.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Incentive
State: Illinois

This law provides model policy ordinances for construction and demolition (C&D) construction, green building, etc.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Green Building, Miscellaneous
State: California

This template offers ideas, provisions, and definitions a local government may chose to include when developing a green building ordinance. This document also includes ordinances and resolutions already passed by Florida jurisdictions.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Green Building
State: Florida

Initiative 202 authorizes the city council to levy and collect a Climate Action Plan Tax from residential, commercial, and industrial power consumers for the purpose of funding a plan to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Miscellaneous
State: Colorado

August 28, 2009, Governor Pat Quinn signed the Energy Efficient Building Act into law. The Act established a statewide residential energy code (for the first time), which requires that newly constructed residential buildings meet the minimum standards set forth in the most recent version of the International Energy Conservation Code (2009 IECC). The Illinois Capital Development Board (CDB) must now review and adopt the code through an administrative proceeding. The Illinois Capital Development Board adopts each new version of the IECC within 9 months of its publication, with an effective date 3 months afterwards. Administrative rules for the law are developed by CDB and approved by the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Administrative Rules (JCAR). Illinois has adopted the last three published versions of ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1. The state is now on track to adopt both residential and commercial consistently. Illinois adopted the 2009 IECC/ASHRAE 90.1-2007 on...

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance
State: Illinois

The Oregon Building Codes Division has the authority to approve and adopt codes and proposed code amendments. The state building code is derived from the most appropriate version of base model codes, which are adopted approximately every 3 years from the last Oregon specialty code effective date. Oregon adopted the OR Residential Specialty Code (ORSC) effective July 1, 2011 and the OR Energy Efficiency Specialty Code (OEESC) for commercial buildings effective July 1, 2010. Oregon has also adopted a commercial reach code, which became effective July 1, 2011. This is a voluntary code based on the International Green Construction Code. Oregon is one of the few states that now has a reach code based on the baseline code, which has exceeded the IECC version for the last two code cycles.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance
State: Oregon

The Virginia Board of Housing and Community Development (a Governor-appointed board) has authority to adopt changes to the Uniform Statewide Building Code (USBC). The adoption process for modifications may take up to 12 months. Virginia is on a 3-year review cycle concurrent with the publications of new editions of the model codes. Virginia has consistently adopted the IECC published versions the past four code cycles. Virginia adopted the 2009 IECC, effective March 1, 2011, with a 1-year phase-in period during which builders and designers can still use the current USBC version.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance
State: Virginia

All new construction and substantial remodels must exceed Title 24 by 10%, use solar as primary heating for pools, insulate hot water pipes, use the Green Materials list for 50% of building square footage or 100% of building fixtures, submit landscape and irrigation plans for approval to the city of Santa Monica, divert 65% of construction and demolition waste from the landfill, and capture and treat rainwater.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance, Exceeding the Code, Green Building
State: California

Massachusetts is required to adopt the latest version of the IECC within 1 year. All commercial buildings must demonstrate full compliance with the energy provisions of the state code.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance
State: Massachusetts

Adoption of the 2009 New Mexico Energy Conservation Code was based on the requirements of the 2009 IECC. Residential structures must comply with envelope and system requirements, including thermal bypass requirements, of ENERGY STAR. Lighting requirements are also based on ENERGY STAR: 75% must be high-efficacy OR 50% of installed lighting must be ENERGY STAR certified. All residential projects must be 20% more efficient than the 2006 IECC. Commercial structures must comply with the 2009 IECC unless more energy efficient standards are provided by the NM code. Effective January 11, 2011.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance, Exceeding the Code
State: New Mexico

Oregon's code amendment proposal application may be used to initiate changes to the current state code.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance
State: Oregon

Ordinance No. 3043 adopts the 2009 IECC and the Oregon Specialty Codes in Ashland, OR.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance
State: Oregon

The Vermont Energy Act of 2009 states that all new residential and commercial buildings must be in compliance with state regulations and building codes. A plan to achieve compliance in 90% of new and renovated homes and buildings must be submitted by September 2011.

Focus: Commercial
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance
State: Vermont

This is a supplemental packet pertaining to code changes, and is an example of how codes are altered. The regulations on duct testing are amended in this packet.

Focus: Commercial, Residential
Category: Code Adoption and Compliance
State: Virginia