Publications

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Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: May 2012
Focus: Code Development

The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) prototype building models (prototype models) were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), to simulate energy savings associated with changes in energy codes and standards. For residential buildings, PNNL utilized two base prototypes to simulate both Single-family detached house, and Multi-family low-rise apartment building types. Energy models for the 2006, 2009 and 2012 versions of the IECC are available for each state.

This set of IECC Prototype Building Models is for the state of Tennessee, using the 2006 IECC as the baseline code.

Each ZIP file includes EnergyPlus model input files (.idf) and corresponding output files (.html).

Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: September 2009
Focus: Adoption

This nationwide analysis of commercial energy code compares ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 with the commercial code in each state as of June 2009. The results are provided in chapters specific to each state.

States with unique energy codes were not included in the analysis because the codes in these states would be difficult to appropriately compare to ASHRAE Standard 90.1 and most of these states have energy offices that routinely assess their codes against the model codes. In states with codes prior to and including the 2000 IECC or Standard 90.1-1999, those states with no statewide energy code, and home rule states which did not specifically request that another code be used, Standard 90.1-1999 was used as the baseline for comparison.

Three DOE Benchmark buildings were used for the simulation used in this analysis: a medium office building (53,600 ft2), a mid-rise apartment building (33,700 ft2), and a non-refrigerated warehouse (49,500 ft2...

Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: September 2009
Focus: Adoption

This analysis of residential energy code compares the requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with the residential code—or typical construction practice in the absence of a code—in most states as of June 2009. The results, which include estimated typical energy savings of updating each state’s code to the 2009 IECC, are provided in chapters specific to each state.

Several states have either not adopted a mandatory energy code or developed their own codes which have minimal or no connection to the IECC. The latter—including California, Florida, Oregon, and Washington— were not included in this analysis because the codes in these states would be difficult to appropriately compare to the 2009 IECC and most of these states have energy offices that have already assessed the IECC on their own.

Document type: Reports and Studies, State-specific
Publication Date: September 2013
Focus: Adoption

Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes.

Document type: Analysis, Reports and Studies
Publication Date: April 2012
Focus: Code Development

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted a series of cost effectiveness analyses for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), covering the 2009 and 2012 editions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for new single and multifamily homes. The evaluations were performed against a 2006 IECC baseline, taking state-specific code amendments into consideration. These reports outline the results of these analyses, including a National Cost Analysis and Cost Analyses for selected states.

Document type: State-specific
Publication Date:
Focus: Adoption

The Tennessee State Fire Marshal’s Office will implement enforcement of adopted energy codes for new building project submissions as of Friday, July 1, 2011. The energy codes adopted are:

  • All buildings other than state buildings: The 2006 International Energy Conservation Code
  • State buildings: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007.