Publications

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Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: May 2012
Focus: Code Development
The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) prototype building models (prototype models) were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), to simulate energy savings associated with changes in energy codes and standards. For residential buildings, PNNL utilized two base prototypes to simulate both Single-family detached house, and Multi-family low-rise apartment building types. Energy models for the 2006, 2009 and 2012 versions of the IECC are available for each state.This set of IECC Prototype Building Models is for the state of Virginia, using a customized version of the 2009 IECC as the baseline code without duct testing requirements.Each ZIP file includes EnergyPlus model input files (.idf) and corresponding output files (.html).
Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: May 2012
Focus: Code Development
The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) prototype building models (prototype models) were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), to simulate energy savings associated with changes in energy codes and standards. For residential buildings, PNNL utilized two base prototypes to simulate both Single-family detached house, and Multi-family low-rise apartment building types. Energy models for the 2006, 2009 and 2012 versions of the IECC are available for each state.This set of IECC Prototype Building Models is for the state of Washington, using the 2006 IECC as the baseline code.Each ZIP file includes EnergyPlus model input files (.idf) and corresponding output files (.html).
Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: May 2012
Focus: Code Development
The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) prototype building models (prototype models) were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), to simulate energy savings associated with changes in energy codes and standards. For residential buildings, PNNL utilized two base prototypes to simulate both Single-family detached house, and Multi-family low-rise apartment building types. Energy models for the 2006, 2009 and 2012 versions of the IECC are available for each state.This set of IECC Prototype Building Models is for the state of West Virginia, using the 2006 IECC as the baseline code.Each ZIP file includes EnergyPlus model input files (.idf) and corresponding output files (.html).
Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: May 2012
Focus: Code Development
The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) prototype building models (prototype models) were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), to simulate energy savings associated with changes in energy codes and standards. For residential buildings, PNNL utilized two base prototypes to simulate both Single-family detached house, and Multi-family low-rise apartment building types. Energy models for the 2006, 2009 and 2012 versions of the IECC are available for each state.This set of IECC Prototype Building Models is for the state of Wisconsin, using a customized version of the 2006 IECC as the baseline code with improved wall insulation and windows.Each ZIP file includes EnergyPlus model input files (.idf) and corresponding output files (.html).
Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: May 2012
Focus: Code Development
The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) prototype building models (prototype models) were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), to simulate energy savings associated with changes in energy codes and standards. For residential buildings, PNNL utilized two base prototypes to simulate both Single-family detached house, and Multi-family low-rise apartment building types. Energy models for the 2006, 2009 and 2012 versions of the IECC are available for each state.This set of IECC Prototype Building Models is for the state of Wyoming, using the 2006 IECC as the baseline code.Each ZIP file includes EnergyPlus model input files (.idf) and corresponding output files (.html).
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: January 2007
Focus: Adoption
As of the writing of this report, the state of Illinois does not have a statewide building energy efficiency code for residential buildings, although a number of jurisdictions in Illinois have adopted the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) or the 2003 IECC.The U.S. Department of Energy requested Pacific Northwest National Laboratory estimate the energy savings, economic impacts, and pollution reduction from adopting the 2006 IECC. This report addresses the impacts for low-rise residential buildings only.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: September 2002
Focus: Adoption
This study includes the impacts of adopting only the building envelope and lighting requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 and applying it only to new commercial construction. This report builds on a previous study that uses prototypical office, retail, and education buildings to estimate life-cycle cost savings estimates per square foot. Office, retail, and education buildings made up over 60% of the total value of new commercial construction in Illinois in 1997.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: April 2004
Focus: Adoption
This report is an update of a previous report, Statewide Savings Projections from the Adoption of a Commercial Building Energy Code in Illinois, completed in September 2002. This updated version incorporates the most recent—as of the writing of this report—gas and electric rates into the analysis.The results of this analysis suggest that adopting and enforcing a commercial building energy code throughout the state of Illinois could produce substantial energy and cost savings, while reducing emissions of greenhouse gases.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: September 2013
Focus: Adoption
In compliance with Title III of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) of 1976, as amended, this is to certify that the State of Illinois has adopted the Illinois Energy Conservation Code, which consists of the 2012 version of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for low-rise residential buildings (with Illinois specific amendments), as well as ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for nonresidential buildings.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: September 2009
Focus: Adoption
This nationwide analysis of commercial energy code compares ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 with the commercial code in each state as of June 2009. The results are provided in chapters specific to each state.States with unique energy codes were not included in the analysis because the codes in these states would be difficult to appropriately compare to ASHRAE Standard 90.1 and most of these states have energy offices that routinely assess their codes against the model codes. In states with codes prior to and including the 2000 IECC or Standard 90.1-1999, those states with no statewide energy code, and home rule states which did not specifically request that another code be used, Standard 90.1-1999 was used as the baseline for comparison.Three DOE Benchmark buildings were used for the simulation used in this analysis: a medium office building (53,600 ft2), a mid-rise apartment building (33,700 ft2), and a non-refrigerated warehouse (49,500 ft2)— representing ASHRAE Standard 90.1 non-...
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: September 2009
Focus: Adoption
This analysis of residential energy code compares the requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with the residential code—or typical construction practice in the absence of a code—in most states as of June 2009. The results, which include estimated typical energy savings of updating each state’s code to the 2009 IECC, are provided in chapters specific to each state.Several states have either not adopted a mandatory energy code or developed their own codes which have minimal or no connection to the IECC. The latter—including California, Florida, Oregon, and Washington— were not included in this analysis because the codes in these states would be difficult to appropriately compare to the 2009 IECC and most of these states have energy offices that have already assessed the IECC on their own.
Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: August 2003
Focus: Adoption
A study prepared for E-Star Colorado, the Colorado Governor's Office of Energy Management and Conservation, and The Energy Foundation in order to analyze potential energy savings. The conclusion of the report recommends "adopting and enforcing up-to-date energy codes...and surpassing the energy performance specified by [these] codes."
Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: March 2005
Focus: Compliance
This report assessed commercial building practices to the 2003 International Code Council International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Plan review and field inspection of 55 new construction commercial buildings determined if the plans complied with the IECC, and if the building was built to the plans and code. Because an energy code had not previously been enforced, personnel were trained to conduct the onsite inspections and collect data on "typical" commercial construction. Compliance issues were identified and documented.
Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Focus: Compliance
Insulation installed in a suspended ceiling does not meet the infiltration requirements of the International Energy Conservation Code. When the insulation is on the suspended ceiling, the ceiling is defined as part of the building envelope. This requires that it be air-sealed like any other envelope component.
Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Focus: Compliance
The effectiveness of insulation is measured by its R-value - the resistance to heat flow. The higher the R-value, the greater the insulating value. The recommended amount of insulation depends on the building design, climate, price of energy, and cost of materials and labor. Choose insulation materials based on the installed cost per R-value per square foot.
Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: August 2012
Focus: Compliance
The intent of the pipe insulation requirements is to reduce temperature changes while fluids are being transported through piping associated with heating, cooling or service hot water (SHW) systems, thereby saving energy and reducing operating costs.
Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: August 2012
Focus: Compliance
The intent of the pipe insulation requirements is to reduce temperature changes while fluids are being transported through piping associated with heating, cooling or service hot water (SHW) systems, thereby saving energy and reducing operating costs.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date:
Focus: Adoption
The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code, was adopted by reference as the residential energy code of the state of Iowa building code, applicable to residential construction limited to three or fewer stories throughout the state of Iowa, with the amendments outlined in this document.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: October 2003
Focus: Adoption
Iowa’s Department of Natural Resources requested that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compare the 1992 Model Energy Code with the 2003 International Energy Code to estimate impacts from updating Iowa's residential energy code to comply with the new code. Under DOE's direction, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) completed an assessment of the impacts from this potential code upgrade, including impacts on construction and energy consumption costs. This report is an update to a similar report completed by PNNL in 2002 that compared the 1992 MEC to the 2000 IECC.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: January 2011
Focus: Adoption
One of the main objectives of the Iowa Commission on Energy Efficiency Standards and Practices was to develop recommendations regarding energy efficiency standards for the construction of buildings, incentives to promote energy efficient construction projects, and recommendations regarding the implementation of a building labeling/ rating system for energy efficient buildings. These recommendations represent actions that can be taken to promote energy efficient standards and practices to reduce energy usage and associated building operating costs.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: November 2010
Focus: Adoption
On January 3, 2011 the Iowa Department of Public Safety, Division of State Fire Marshal, increased the scope of its energy code plan review. The State Building Code Bureau was awarded a Community Development Block Grant through the U.S. Department of Energy to fund two positions to aid in the enforcement of the State Energy Code. These positions develop energy code enforcement tools and provide energy code outreach to local jurisdictions.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: March 2010
Focus: Adoption
This form is to be used by Iowa registered architects and licensed professional engineers to show compliance with Iowa Code 103A.19 and Administrative Rule 661-303.1(3), in the design of buildings which are subject to this law.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date:
Focus: Adoption
The Iowa state building code commissioner, with the approval of the advisory council, formulates, adopts, amends and/or revises and promulgates reasonable rules designed to establish minimum safeguards in building construction, and establishes regulations to protect the health, safety, and welfare of the public.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: September 2012
Focus: Compliance, Enforcement
This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
The State of Iowa has adopted the residential energy code requirements of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), effective as of 01/01/10 (Iowa Administrative Code 661 - Chaper 303.2 with reference to Iowa Code section 103A). Iowa has adopted the commercial energy code requrements of the 2009 IECC, effective as of 01/01/10 (Iowa Administrative Code 661 - Chaper 303.3 with reference to Iowa Code section 103A).  ASHRAE Standard 90.1 is adopted by reference for the commercial part of the code in Section 501.2 of the 2009 IECC.
Document type: Proposals
Publication Date: March 2010
Focus: Code Development
The New Buildings Institute (NBI) and American Institute of Architects believe that the 20% to 30% reductions in commercial and high-rise residential building energy use based on this proposal are practical, feasible, and necessary. This proposal employs improvements to design practices and use of widely available products to improve energy efficiency. Many of the elements have been previously published in NBI’s Core Performance Guide and implemented in programs or codes at the local and state levels. Incorporating these enhancements in a model code will help move building practices and markets more quickly, addressing national concerns for energy and the environment in a pragmatic and cost-effective way.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
In compliance with Title III of the Energy Conservation adn Production Act (ECPA) of 1976, as amended, this is to certify that the Commonwealth of Kentuchy has adopted by reference the 2009 version of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) afor low-rise residential builidings, as well as ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for non-residential buildings (by virtue of its reference within the 2009 IECC).
Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: August 2012
Focus: Compliance
Kitchen and dining facilities use a large amount of energy per floor area. Kitchen exhaust hoods contribute greatly to that energy use. Energy is used both to operate fans and to heat and cool makeup air that is then exhausted.
Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Focus: Compliance
Revisions and additions in the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 affect most new building designs. These requirements are mandatory and cannot be traded away, but options and exceptions are provided to meet the needs of various building and space types and activities. The requirements are categorized into two general areas: basic space control and automatic shutoff controls.
Document type: Resource Guide
Publication Date: September 2012
Focus: Adoption, Code Development, Compliance
This guide provides information for anyone dealing with a lighting energy code or standard. It provides background and development information to help readers understand the basis for requirements and their intent. The guide also provides detailed explanations of the major types of requirements such that users can more effectively design to meet compliance while applying the most flexibility possible.
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
The energycode for one- and two-family residential structures in Louisiana is Part IV: Energy Conservation of the 2006 IRC. 2009 IECC is currently being enforced in low-rise, multifamily residential structures. ASHRAE 90.1-2007 is currently enforced for commercial construction.This letter certifies that ACT 390 of 2013 has been signed by the Governor, and it will update Part IV: Energy Conservation of the 2009 IRC effective January 1, 2014, and that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 is the code  currently enforced by the Louisiana Office of the State Fire Marshal for commercial construction.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: December 2006
Focus: Adoption
At the request of the Government Accountability Office, The U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) undertook an analysis of the energy savings and cost impacts associated with the use of newer and more efficient commercial building energy codes in the states of Louisiana and Mississippi. BECP looked at three levels of energy standards – ASHRAE Standard 90-75, ASHRAE 90.1-2001, and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 – that cover both the full range of standards currently on the books in Louisiana and Mississippi and the logical next standards for these states.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: January 2007
Focus: Adoption
At the request of the Government Accountability Office, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program undertook an analysis of the energy savings and cost impacts associated with the use of newer and more efficient residential building energy codes in the states of Louisiana and Mississippi.The intent of this analysis is to determine the potential energy and economic impacts from improved energy efficiency alternatives available for residential buildings during the reconstruction process after Hurricane Katrina.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: October 2009
Focus: Adoption
The Maine Legislature enacted the Uniform Building and Energy Code (PL 2007, Chapter 699 and amendments PL 2009, Chapter 261). This document provides some answers to frequently-asked questions about the code.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
The State of Maine has adopted building codes for energy efficiency; they are included in the Maine Uniform Building and Energy Code (MUBEC). The State of Maine has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code, as well as ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007.  The 2009 IECC is required; ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 is included as part of MUBEC, but compliance is not mandatory.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
By legislation, the Maryland Building Performance Standards (MPBS) which was adopted in 1994 is updated every three years to coincide with the International Code Council (ICC) change cycle, as the ICC updates their I-codes. The MBPS adopted the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code and ASHRAE 90.1-2010 on January 1, 2012. Maryland legislation requires the State of Maryland to adopt the first printing of the latest International Building Code, International Residential Code and the International Energy Conservation Code within one year of publication by the ICC.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: January 2010
Focus: Adoption
In accordance with the statutory requirements of the Green Communities Act, the Board of Building Regulations and Standards amended the Massachusetts Building Code as of January 1, 2010, requiring the use of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code with Massachusetts amendments.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date:
Focus: Adoption
780 CMR: MASSACHUSETTS AMENDMENTS TO THE INTERNATIONAL BUILDING CODE 2009: Buildings in the state of Massachusetts shall be designed and constructed in accordance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code with Massachusetts Amendments as described in this document:.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
The Massachusetts Board of Building Regulations and Standards (BBRS) in consultation with the Deparment of Energy Resources has amended the Massachusetts statewide building code in line with the recommendations of the Department of Energy on the following occasions:On October 17, 2008, the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 was adopted as chapter thirteen of the amended Massachusetts seventh edition building energy code.On Jauary 1, 2010, the IECC 2009 was adopted and by direct reference the ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2007 was maintained in the amended Massachusetts seventh edition building energy code. 
Document type: Compliance Tool
Publication Date: October 2010
Focus: Compliance
This document contains a flier and letter templates for use by states. Example:Buildings account for roughly 40 percent of the nation’s energy consumption. Enhancing their efficiency will lead to a stronger economy, a cleaner environment, and decreased dependence on imported oil. With this goal in mind, the (state organization), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), is asking local jurisdictions to participate in a statewide study to measure compliance rates with building energy codes. This letter is meant to familiarize you with the study and to solicit your support for this important activity.
Document type: Compliance Tool, Reports and Studies
Publication Date: March 2010
Focus: Compliance
In this document, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program provides a detailed set of procedures that may help states as they engage in activities in support of code implementation and enforcement as well as measurement of the compliance rate associated with the codes and standards named in legislation, most notably those associated with measuring and reporting rates of compliance.
Document type: Compliance Tool, Reports and Studies
Publication Date: March 2010
Focus: Compliance
To supplement the Measuring State Energy Code Compliance report, this user-friendly action plan summarizes the main procedures, shows further options, and points to several ready-made resources and web-based tools U.S Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program is releasing to support the process.
Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: October 2011
Focus: Compliance
ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 and the commercial provisions of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code require that the building envelope be carefully designed to limit uncontrolled air leakage into and out of the building.
Document type: Technical Support Document
Publication Date: September 2012
Focus: Compliance
This report explains the methodology used to develop Version 4.4.3 of the REScheck software developed for the 1992, 1993, and 1995 editions of the MEC, and the 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, and 2012 editions of the IECC, and the 2006 edition of the International Residential Code (IRC). Although some requirements contained in these codes have changed, the methodology used to develop the REScheck software for these editions is similar. Beginning with REScheck Version 4.4.0, support for 1992, 1993, and 1995 MEC and the 1998 IECC is no longer included, but those sections remain in this document for reference purposes.
Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: April 2012
Focus: Code Development
The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE’s) Building Energy Codes Program has developed and established a methodology for evaluating the energy and economic performance of residential energy codes. This methodology serves two primary purposes. First, as DOE participates in the consensus processes of the International Code Council, the methodology described herein will be used by DOE to ensure that its proposals are both energy efficient and cost effective. Second, when a new version of the International Energy Conservation Code is published, DOE will evaluate the new code as a whole to establish expected energy savings and cost effectiveness, which will help states and local jurisdictions interested in adopting the new codes. DOE’s measure of cost-effectiveness balances longer-term energy savings against additions to initial costs through a life-cycle cost perspective.
Document type: Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: September 2006
Focus: Adoption
The state of Michigan asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 as they consider adoption of this energy code in place of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. The primary change of interest in the lighting section of the 90.1-2004 Standard is the set of revised interior lighting power densities that provide for stricter lighting compliance levels.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: November 2010
Focus: Adoption
Rules governing the energy efficiency for the design and construction of buildings and structures, not including residential buildings, shall be those contained in the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), section 501.1 and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007, including appendices A, B, C, and D. With the amendments noted, Section 501.1 of the IECC and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 are adopted in these rules by reference.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
The State of Michigan adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code for residential construction, which became effective March 9, 2011.The State of Michigan adopted the ASHRAE 90.1-2007 standard for commercial construction, which became effective March 9, 2011.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
In compliance with Title III of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) of 1976, as amended, this is to certify that the State of Mississippi has adopted teh ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 for non-residential buildings.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
In reference to Title III of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) of 1976, as amended, this letter serves to certify the State of Mississippi's request for an extension of time to adopt a residential energy code which is equivalent to the 2009 version of the International Energy Conservation Code for low-rise residential buildings.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: March 2007
Focus: Adoption
At the request of the Montana Energy Office, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program undertook an analysis of the energy savings associated with slab insulation in small commercial buildings.
Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: April 2011
Focus: Code Development
This speadsheet provides a summary of the percentage of energy savings with plug loads for the ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Prototype Building Models.
Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date:
Focus: Code Development
More than 200,000 homes are factory built in the United States each year to the federally preemptive Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards, mandated by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). This paper analyzes national energy use and savings potential from improvements to thermal distribution system efficiency, thermal envelopes, and heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) equipment over what is currently required by HUD code. Estimated energy savings over current HUD code are provided for four cases: National Fire Protection Association Standard 501-2005, the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ENERGY STAR manufactured housing guidelines , and Best Practice, based on the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building America Industrialized Housing Partnership program home built in the Pacific Northwest. Savings estimates are also provided from improved HVAC system efficiencies,...
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date:
Focus: Adoption
In compliance with Title III of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) of 1976, as amended, this letter is to certify that the State of Nebraska has updated the Nebraska Enery Code, which references the 2009 version of the International Energy Conservation Code, as well as ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for non-residential buildings.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: September 2012
Focus: Compliance, Enforcement
This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: June 2013
Focus: Adoption
In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's July 20, 2011 notice of determination in the Federal Register regarding ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA 90.1-2007, the State of Nevada certifies that it has reviewed the provisions of Nevada's building energy codes and has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) with reference to ASHRAE 90.1-2007 as the statewide minimum standard for commercial buildings, effective July 1, 2012.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: June 2013
Focus: Adoption
In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's July 19, 2011 notice of determination in the Federal Register regarding the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC), the State of Nevada certifies that it has reviewed the provisions of Nevada's residential energy codes; conducted a regulation workshop and three regulation hearings to seek public comment as required pursuant to Nevada Revised Statute (NRS); and has adopted the 2009 IECC as the statewide minimum standard, effective July 1, 2012.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date:
Focus: Adoption
Residential energy code application for certification of compliance for new construction, additions or renovations.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
The New Hampshire Office of Energy and Planning hereby certifies that the State of New Hampshire has a residential building energy code that meets the requirements of the 2009 IECC, and a commercial building energy code that meets ASHRAE 90.1-2007.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: August 2011
Focus: Adoption
In compliance with the Title III of the Energy Conservation and Production Act of 1976, as amended, this document certifies that the state of New Jersey has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for low-rise residential buildings, along with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings and all other residential buildings not covered under the 2009 IECC.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: January 2003
Focus: Adoption
This paper presents an assessment of the energy savings and economic impact for New Mexico to adopt the 2000 International Energy Conservation Code. As of the writing of this report, the state of New Mexico bases its commercial building energy code on the 1986 Model Energy Code, which in turn references ASHRAE Standard 90a-1980 for the commercial building portion of the energy code.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
This letter certifies New Mexico's compliance with the Energy Conservation and Production Act of 1976 (ECPA), as amended . The State of New Mexico has adopted the New Mexico Energy Conservation Code, which references the 2009 version of the International Energy Conservation Code with amendments for residential buildings as well as ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: August 2007
Focus: Adoption
At the request of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority and New York State Department of State, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program undertook an analysis of the energy savings and cost impacts associated with the proposed adoption of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004, and compared it with the requirements based on ASHRAE Standards 90.1-1999 and 90.1-2001.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: April 2004
Focus: Adoption
The state of New York asked the U.S. Department of Energy to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the requirement for heat recovery for service water heating that exists in the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code to determine whether this requirement should be adopted into the New York State Energy code.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: September 2004
Focus: Adoption
The New York State Department of State requested the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) compare the effects on energy usage as a result of implementation of the 2004 Supplement to the International Energy Conservation Code with the current New York code. The comparison had to determine whether additional costs of compliance with the proposal would be equal to or less than the present value of anticipated energy cost savings over a 10-year period. Under DOE's direction, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory completed the requested assessment of the potential code upgrade.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: June 2009
Focus: Adoption
The state of New York requested that the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) provide an analysis of the impacts of adoption of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007. New York State is unique among states in requiring a ten-year payback for energy code measures. BECP based this analysis on the results of a nationwide, state-by-state code comparison for DOE. This analysis indicates that the adoption of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 is cost-effective under New York’s requirements for all buildings in New York.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: June 2004
Focus: Adoption
The state of New York asked the U.S. Department of Energy to analyze the potential energy effect and cost-effectiveness of the lighting requirements in the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code as they consider adoption of this energy code. The new provisions of interest in the lighting section of the 2003 IECC include new lighting power densities and requirements for automatic lighting shutoff controls.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
In compliance with Title III of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) of 1976, as amended, this is to certify that the State of New York has adopted the 2010 edition of the Energy Conservation Construction Code of New York State (the "2010 ECCCNYS") as New York State's building energy code for residential buildings and non-residential (commercial) buildings.With regard to residential buildings, the 2010 ECCCNYS is based on, and is equivalent to or more stringent than, the 2009 version of the International Energy Conservation Code.With regard to commercial buildings, the 2010 ECCCNYS is equivalent to or more stringent than ASHRAE 90.1-2007.
Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: June 2011
Focus: Compliance
The use of header stock over windows and doors in nonbearing walls is typical construction practice throughout the industry. But a single two-inch by four-inch board is allowed to be used as a header in non-load bearing wall systems..
Document type: Reports and Studies, State-specific
Publication Date: March 2000
Focus: Adoption
This study focuses on verifying that buildings are designed and built to comply with the energy code requirements. The goal of the recommended program is to collect sufficient information to describe construction characteristics and practices related to energy efficiency in new residential and non-residential construction in a representative sample of North Carolina city and county code jurisdictions.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's July 20, 2011 notice of determination in the Federal Register, North Carolina certifies that it has reviewed and updated the provisions of the 2012 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code governing commercial building energy efficiency to meet or exceed the requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007.  An amendment was later adopted that will require compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010, effective January 1, 2015.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
In response to the U.S. Department of Energy's July 19, 2011 notice of determination in the Federal Register, North Carolina certifies that it has reviewed and updated the provisions of the 2012 North Carolina Energy Conservation Code governing residential building energy efficiency to meet or exceed the requirements of the 2009 Internation Energy Conservation Code. 
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: April 2004
Focus: Adoption
This report evaluates the potential costs and benefits to North Dakota residents from updating and requiring compliance with ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2001.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
The Board conducted public hearings on November 13, 2009 and January 21, 2011 on proposed updates to the Ohio Building Code including updating the referenced ASHRAE 90.l Standard from the 2004 to the 2007 edition. The Board subsequently adopted these updates effective November 1, 2011 for all new nonresidential construction in Ohio.The Residential Construction Advisory Committee recommended to the Board that it update the referenced IECC Standard from the 2006 to the 2009 edition, adopt the Ohio Home Builders Association Prescriptive Energy Code Option, and adopt the International Residential Code Chapter 11 requirements with U.S. Department of Energy recommended changes to achieve energy efficiency equivalency to the 2009 IECC as all valid options for energy code compliance in Ohio. The Board accepted the recommendations of the RCAC and conducted a public hearing on these and other updates to the Residential Code of Ohio on April 26, 2012. The Board subsequently adopted these updates...
Document type: Comparison
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Regulatory
After a regulatory action has been issued, Section 6(a)(3)(E) of Executive Order (EO) 12866 requires agencies to identify in a complete, clear, and simple manner, the substantive changes between the draft submitted to The Office of Management and Budget's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for review and the action subsequently announced, and identify those changes in the regulatory action that were made at the suggestion or recommendation of OIRA. This OMB compare document is intended to comply with this requirement.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date:
Focus: Adoption
National codes and standards are incorporated by reference.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date:
Focus: Adoption
This document outlines the organization and division of the Oklahoma Uniform Building Code Commission.
Document type: Comparison
Publication Date: May 2012
Focus: Regulatory
After a regulatory action has been issued, Section 6(a)(3)(E) of Executive Order 12866 requires agencies to identify in a complete, clear, and simple manner, the substantive changes between the draft of the final determination submitted to The Office of Management and Budget's (OMB's) Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for review and this final determination, and identify those changes in this determination that were made at the suggestion or recommendation of OIRA. This OMB compare document is intended to comply with this requirement.
Document type: Comparison
Publication Date: May 2012
Focus: Regulatory
After a regulatory action has been issued, Section 6(a)(3)(E) of Executive Order 12866 requires agencies to identify in a complete, clear, and simple manner, the substantive changes between the draft submitted to Office of Management and Budget's (OMB's) Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for review and the action subsequently announced, and identify those changes in the regulatory action that were made at the suggestion or recommendation of OIRA. This OMB compare document is intended to comply with this requirement.
Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: June 2011
Focus: Compliance
The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code, Section 403.2.2, requires that duct systems be pressure tested, or all ducts and air handlers be located in conditioned space. Building cavities used to convey return air located over a crawlspace or next to an unconditioned space would be required to be tested.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: December 2008
Focus: Adoption
Para-Technical's checklist for the Oregon code adoption process.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date:
Focus: Adoption, Commercial, Residential
The Building Codes Division, part of the Department of Consumer and Business Services, enforces the building code to protect the public and prevent unsafe construction work. Oregon has one statewide building code providing a uniform, consistent and predictable process for Oregon’s construction industry, the public, and state and local government.Oregon’s building code is applicable in all cities and counties and is enforced locally across the state. The Division provides code enforcement in areas of the state where the local jurisdiction does not.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: June 2013
Focus: Adoption
In compliance with Title III of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) of 1976, as amended, this is to certify that the State of Oregon has adopted the 2010 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code, which is equivalent to ASHRAE 90.1-2010 for non-residential structures. The State of Oregon has adopted the  2011 Residential Energy Efficiency Specialty Code with energy provisions exceeding those of the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for low-rise residential buildings.
Publication Date: July 2009
Focus: Compliance
The overall objective of the combined studies covered in this report is to provide the Vermont Department of Public Service (DPS) with residential new construction market assessments and baselines to help identify opportunities for increased energy efficiency in Vermont. This report summarizes the combined findings of a phone survey of 296 homeowners, on-site audits conducted at 106 recently constructed homes across Vermont, and in-depth interviews with 25 builders, nine HVAC contractors and ten insulation contractors.
Document type: State-specific, Technical Assistance report
Publication Date: February 2001
Focus: Adoption
The Pennsylvania Housing Research Center (PHRC) has created a proposed alternative path for complying with the energy efficiency provisions of the2000 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) or the 2000 International Residential Code (IRC) for residential buildings. The Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry requested that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) evaluate the PHRC proposal to determine whether it meets or exceeds the energy efficiency requirements of the IECC. Under DOE's direction, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory reviewed and assessed the PRHC proposal.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: September 2009
Focus: Adoption
In November 1999, the Pennsylvania Legislature passed ACT 45, known as the Uniform Construction Code, into law mandating a statewide building code across Pennsylvania. Act 45 requires the Pennsylvania Department of Labor and Industry (DLI) to promulgate regulations to implement the requirements of the legislation and, in addition, to consider the development of alternative prescriptive methods for energy conservation that account for the various climatic regions within the Commonwealth. In deriving these energy standards, the DLI was to seek to balance energy savings with initial construction costs.
Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Focus: Adoption
In accordance with the provisions of Section 304(a) of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended, this is to certify that the Commonwealth of Pennslyvania has adopted the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and, by reference, ASHRAE 90.1-2007.
Document type: Reports and Studies, State-specific
Publication Date: September 2013
Focus: Adoption
Are there advantages to states that adopt the most recent model building energy codes other than saving energy? For example, can the construction activity and energy savings associated with code-compliant housing units become significant sources of job creation for states if new building energy codes are adopted to cover residential construction? The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) asked Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to research and ascertain whether jobs would be created in individual states based on their adoption of model building energy codes.
Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Focus: Compliance
The Building Energy Codes Program compliance tools -- COMcheck™, COMcheck-Web™, REScheck™, and REScheck-Web™ -- have the capability to upload and download files to and from the desktop and Web-based versions of the software you are using.
Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: June 2008
Focus: Compliance
This study looked at seven building measures in both the residential and nonresidential sectors to learn how closely actual building practices adhere to newly adopted codes. Data were collected by reviewing permits and conducting verification site visits for a sample of building projects throughout the state. Key findings from this study include quantitative estimates of noncompliance rates for the seven measures, as well as qualitative information about some unexpected complexities associated with data collection efforts around building practices, both at building departments (during permit review) and at building sites (during inspection).
Document type: Analysis
Publication Date:
Focus: Code Development
A quantitative analysis of the estimated differences between ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1989 and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 to inform and support the final determination.
Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Focus: Compliance
ASHRAE Standard 90.1 and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)have a long, intertwined history of development, starting with the original development of ASHRAE Standard 90-75 in direct response to the oil crisis in 1973, and continuing on to the latest documents.
Document type: Reports and Studies, State-specific
Publication Date: November 2013
Focus: Adoption
House Bill 202, which was passed during the 2013 Legislative Session, adopted a hybrid version of the 2006, 2009 and 2012 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) in Utah (“Utah 2012”) for residential buildings and the complete 2012 IECC for commercial buildings. The Utah 2012 and IECC 2012 commercial provisions take effect after the Uniform Building Code Commission certifies in writing to the Utah Legislature that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has adopted a version of REScheck software that can be used to verify compliance with the provisions in H.B. 202.
Document type: Technical Support Document
Publication Date:
Focus: Compliance
This guide describes how to use the REScheck™ software. REScheck is designed to demonstrate compliance with the requirements of the Council of American Building Officials' Model Energy Code (MEC) and the International Code Council's International Energy Conservation Code. It is the most flexible approach for meeting the MEC insulation and window requirements.
Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: June 2009
Focus: Compliance
The objective of this report is to assess the compliance of newly-constructed single-family homes with the Vermont Residential Building Energy Standards (RBES). This analysis is part of a broader study of the single-family residential new construction market in Vermont.
Document type: Compliance Tool
Publication Date: June 2012
Focus: Compliance
In supporting state energy code compliance evaluations, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) has developed residential data collection checklists. The checklists are available for use as paper checklists or electronic Microsoft® Word® forms.The BECP also developed an online tool, the Checklist Score + Store. While overall compliance can be determined manually for individual buildings and groups of renovations, this tool provides automated building scores and state-wide consolidation of data. Individual building scores will remain confidential (available only to the state and their contractors), but storing data nationally will shed valuable light on nationwide compliance, as well as changes in compliance over time.Guidelines for using the following checklists to evaluate state energy code compliance can be found in...
Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: February 2007
Focus: Compliance
The primary goal of this paper was to review existing energy code evaluation studies, and make recommendations for future work in this area. The secondary purpose is to address this existing body of literature as it relates to the quantification of the savings gap, defined as the energy savings foregone due to non-compliance with the energy code adopted in a state or local jurisdiction.
Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: August 2012
Focus: Compliance
Over the past several code cycles, mechanical ventilation requirements have been added to ensure adequate outside air is provided for ventilation whenever residences are occupied. These ventilation requirements can be found in the International Residential Code for homes and the International Mechanical Code for dwelling units in multifamily buildings.
Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: June 2011
Focus: Compliance
The 2006 and 2009 International Energy Conservation Code require sizing calculations be performed on every home by referencing International Residential Code Section M1401.3. Section M1401.3 requires heating and cooling systems be sized to the Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual J - Eighth Addition or other approved heating and cooling load calculations. The ACCA sizing methodology has sufficient built-in safety factors to accommodate most conditioning needs.
Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: May 2004
Focus: Compliance
A study prepared for the Long Island Power Authority to analyze "new construction practices and market conditions from the summer and fall of 2003." The results of the study were used during the design of the Long Island Power Authority's New York ENERGY STAR Labeled Homes Program (NYESLHP).

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