Illinois

Current News: 
2015 IECC with amendments became effective January 1, 2016.
Current Code:
2015 IECC with Amendments
Amendments / Additional State Code Information: Illinois-specific amendments
Approved Compliance Tools: Can use COMcheck
Approximate Energy Efficiency: Equivalent to 2015 IECC
Effective Date:
Jan. 01, 2016
Adoption Date:
Dec. 11, 2015
Code Enforcement:
Mandatory
DOE Determination: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007: No
ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010: Yes

Energy cost savings for Illinois resulting from the state updating its commercial and residential building energy codes in accordance with federal law are significant, estimated to be on the order of nearly $270 million annually by 2030.

Illinois DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013

Illiniois State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes
Current Code:
2015 IECC with Amendments
Amendments / Additional State Code Information:

Amendements below include but not limited to:

Tables R402.1.2 Insulation/Fenestration and R402.1.4 Amended as follows –

Climate Zone 4:   SHGC not required, 2015 IECC requires 0.40

Climate Zone 5:   Basement Wall Insulation  10/13, 2015 IECC requires 15/19

                          Basement Wall Total U-factor   0.059, 2015 IECC requires 0.050

 

R402.2.9 Basement walls. Walls associated with

conditioned basements shall be insulated from the top

of the basement wall down to 10 feet (3048 mm)

below grade or to within six-inches (152 mm) of the

basement floor, whichever is less. Walls associated

with unconditioned basements shall meet this

requirement unless the floor overhead is insulated in

accordance with Sections R402.1.2 and R402.2.8.

Exception: Walls associated with conditioned

basements may be insulated from the top of the

basement wall down to 4 feet (1219 mm) below

grade when the Basement Wall R-value is at

least 15/19, (Basement Wall U-Factor of

0.050).

R402.4.1.2 Testing. The building or dwelling unit

shall be tested and verified as having an air leakage

rate of not exceeding five air changes per hour (ACH)

in Climate Zones 4 and 5 (2015 IECC requires 3 ACH/50 for Climate Zones 4 and 5).  The building or dwelling

unit shall be provided with a whole – house

mechanical ventilation system as designed in

accordance with Section R403.6.

Exceptions:

 For additions, alterations, renovations or

repairs to existing buildings, building envelope

tightness and insulation installation shall be

considered acceptable when the items in Table

R402.4.1.1, applicable to the method of

construction, are field verified. Where required

by the code official, an approved third party

independent from the installer, shall inspect both

air barrier and insulation installation criteria.

 

Alterations: Exceptions:

- For roof replacement on existing buildings

with a roof slope of less than 2 units vertical

in 12 units horizontal (2:12), and where the

roof covering is removed and insulation

remains, and where the required R-value

cannot be provided due to thickness

limitations presented by existing rooftop

conditions, (including heating, ventilating

and air-conditioning equipment, low door

or glazing heights, parapet heights, weep

holes, and roof flashing heights not meeting

the manufacturer’s specifications), the

maximum thickness of insulation compatible

with the available space and existing uses

shall be installed. Insulation used shall be

minimum R-3.5 per inch. In areas where

flashing may be terminated a minimum of 8

inches above the roof covering (including

required insulation) insulation shall be a

minimum of R-20.

- R-value for roof assemblies with tapered

insulation above deck with slope greater

than 1/8 units vertical in 12 units horizontal

(1/8:12) shall average R-20.

 

Deleted Section R402.4.2 Rooms containing fuel burning appliances in its entirety.



Illinois-specific amendments
Approved Compliance Tools: Can use REScheck
Approximate Energy Efficiency: Less energy efficient than 2015 IECC
Effective Date:
Jan. 01, 2016
Adoption Date:
Dec. 11, 2015
Code Enforcement:
Mandatory
Jurisdictions:
DOE Determination: 2009 IECC: No
2012 IECC: Yes

Energy cost savings for Illinois resulting from the state updating its commercial and residential building energy codes in accordance with federal law are significant, estimated to be on the order of nearly $270 million annually by 2030.

Illinois DOE Determination Letter, May 31, 2013

Illiniois State Certification of Commercial and Residential Building Energy Codes
Code Change Process:
Both Regulatory and Legislative
Code Change Cycle:
Automatic Adoption
Timeline of Cycle:
Every 3 years

State Owned / Funded Buildings

On August 24, 2009 Illinois Governor Quinn signed SB 1601, enacting Public Act 96-0630. The act, to take effect in January 2010, addresses several components of building design to improve sustainability through renovation projects. LEED and Green Globes certification costs are funded by the Illinois Tax Increment Fund.

On July 24, 2009, Governor Quinn signed into law HB 1013, requiring all new state-funded building construction and major renovation of existing state-owned facilities to seek LEED or equivalent certification. New buildings and major renovations of 10,000 sq ft or more must achieve at minimum LEED Silver or equivalent certification. New buildings and major renovations under 10,000 sq ft must strive to meet the highest standard of the LEED rating system or equivalent, but are not required to achieve certification.

The Illinois State Senate amended the School Construction Law (Public Act 95-0416) with governor approval, directing the Capital Development Board to only issue grants to school projects with LEED for Schools or comparable rating system certification, or to projects that meet the standards set forth by the Capital Development Board Green Building Advisory Committee.

Adoption Process

The state and local governments can adopt building codes. Local governments are free to adopt stricter energy conservation Laws for commercial buildings. However, for residential buildings, local governments may not adopt or regulate energy conservation standards either less or more energy efficient than the Illinois Energy Conservation Code.

Exceptions which would allow local governments to regulate energy efficiency standards in a stricter manner are municipalities or counties which meet one of the following three provisions:

  • A unit of local government that on or before May 15, 2009 adopted or incorporated by reference energy efficient building standards for residential building that are equivalent to or more energy efficient than the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code.
  • A unit of local government that on or before May 15, 2009 provided to the Capital Development Board identification of an energy efficient building code or amendment that is equivalent to or more energy efficient than the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code.
  • A municipality with a population of 1,000,000 or more.

Background

The primary energy conservation law in Illinois was the Illinois Public Utilities Act (revised in 1986). This law required Illinois investor-owned electric utilities to use least-cost energy planning, which required the use of economical energy conservation when new resources for electricity were required.

The Energy Conservation Code for state projects was approved by legislators in 2003 and the administrative rules for the law were developed by CDB and approved by the General Assembly's Joint Committee on Administrative Rules in 2004 and updated to include the 2004 edition of ASHRAE Standard 90.1.

The administrative rules moving the energy code for commercial buildings to the 2006 edition of the International Energy Conservation Code were adopted by CDB and the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules and became effective October 9, 2007.

On Friday, August 28, 2009, Governor Pat Quinn signed the Energy Efficient Building Act into law. The Act established a statewide residential energy code, which requires that newly constructed residential buildings meet the minimum standards set forth in the most recent version of the International Energy Conservation Code (2009 IECC). The Illinois Capital Development Board (CDB) must now review and adopt the code though an administrative proceeding.

The requirements of the new energy code will apply to all new residential and commercial buildings (including alterations, additions, renovations, and repairs). Local jurisdictions would be prohibited from adopting energy codes more or less energy efficient for residential buildings (although exemptions are provided for municipalities that have already adopted a code equivalent to or more energy efficient than the 2006 IECC [before May 15, 2009] or those that have a population of more than 1 million) and from adopting energy codes less energy efficient for commercial buildings.

Senate Bill 3724, signed by the Governor on August 17, 2012, amends the effective date of the 2012 IECC to January 1, 2013.  Administrative Rules to adopt the 2012 IECC with amendments were approved by the Joint Committee on Administrative Rules on December 11, 2012.