Publications

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Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: January 2007
Page Focus: Compliance

A study of U.S. architects, electrical engineers, lighting designers, and building contractors and their attitudes and compliance rates; sponsored by the Architectural Products Magazine and the Lighting Controls Association. The purpose of the study was to discover to what extent commercial energy codes are being implemented and enforced.

Document type: Other
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

The compliance toolkit describes the steps that should be taken by the build community to make sure that their buildings meet the requirements of the energy codes in effect where the buildings are being built and that the building designs are well documented so that the enforcement community can quickly and easily determine if the building meets the requirement of the energy code.

This toolkit describes the steps that should be taken by the build community to make sure that their buildings meet the requirements of the energy codes in effect where the buildings are being built and that the building designs are well documented so that the enforcement community can quickly and easily determine if the building meets the requirement of the energy code.

Document type: Other
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Adoption, Code Development, Compliance, Enforcement

Buildings account for almost 40% of the energy used in the United States and, as a direct result of that use, our environment and economy are impacted. Building energy codes and standards provide an effective response. The Building Energy Codes Program designed the Adoption, Compliance, and Enforcement (ACE) Learning Series for those in the building industry having the greatest potential to influence the adoption of and compliance with building energy codes and standards. Each toolkit in the ACE Learning Series delivers essential information to enable designers, specifiers, builders, building owners, policy makers, code officials, and others involved in building design and construction to understand the important role building energy codes play in helping us all address our energy, economic, and environmental challenges.

Document type: Other
Publication Date: September 2013
Page Focus: Compliance

This document, concerning Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance with Building Energy Codes, is an action issued by the Department of Energy. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

[6450-01-P]
DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
[Docket No. EERE-2013-BT-BC-0036]
Activities and Methodology for Assessing Compliance with Building Energy Codes
AGENCY: Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Department of Energy.
ACTION: Notice of reopening of public comment period.

Document type: Other
Publication Date:
Page Focus: Adoption, Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guides (AEDGs) are a series of publications designed to provide recommendations for achieving energy savings over the minimum code requirements of ASHRAE Standard 90.1. This is the first step in the process toward achieving a net zero energy building—defined as a building that, on an annual basis, draws equal or less energy from outside resources than it provides using on-site, renewable energy sources. The guides have been developed in coordination with the following organizations: the American Institute of Architects, the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, the U.S. Green Building Council, and the U.S. Department of Energy. The New Building Institute participated in the development of the initial guide.

More information on the AEDGs may be found on the Building Technologies Office Commercial Buildings website.

...

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on cool roofs, which are recommended for metal building roofs and roofs with insulation entirely above deck.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on heating and cooling system design loads for the purpose of sizing systems and equipment should be calculated in accordance with generally accepted engineering standards and handbooks such as ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on expanded recommendations for daylighting controls; photo sensor placement; calibration and commissioning; daylight levels.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on glazing; glare and contrast; window design and placement.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on visual light transmission; window and office placement; glazing; etc.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on ductwork distribution; duct insulation; duct sealing and leakage; fan motors

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on exterior lighting power; decorative façade lighting; sources.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on mass floors; steel joist or wood frame floors; slab-on-grade floors.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on lighting walls and ceilings; task lighting; reflectances; lamps and ballasts; occupancy sensors; multi-level switching; electric lighting and daylight controls; exit signs.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2010
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on the 0.9 W/ft2 foot goal for lighting power which represents an average lighting power density for the entire building. An example design describes one way (but not the only way) that this watts-per-square-foot limit can be met.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on moisture control and air infiltration control.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on noise path for heating, ventilation, and air conditioning units.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on insulation entirely above-deck; metal buildings; attics and other roofs; single-rafter roofs.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on service water heating types; sizing; equipment efficiency; location; pipe insulation.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: April 2008
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on testing, adjusting, and balancing; heating sources; filters.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on ventilation air; exhaust air; control strategies; carbon dioxide sensors; economizers.

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on mass walls; metal building, steel framed, wood frame and other walls

Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on thermal zones and zone temperature control.

Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Compliance, Enforcement

This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: March 2011
Page Focus: Compliance

Automatic shutoff capability for all interior building lighting (with exceptions) is required by ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 (as well as previous versions back to 1999) and the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (including versions back to 2003) for buildings over 5,000ft2.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: July 2008
Page Focus: Adoption, Compliance

This report described the results of a two-year Northwest Energy Efficiency Alliance study intended to improve understanding of the new commercial building stock in the Pacific Northwest region. It provided a new regional baseline for practices in commercial buildings constructed between 2002 and 2004 and compared those practices with previous baseline and code compliance studies conducted from 1996 to 1998. The study also looked at changes in design professionals' attitudes toward energy efficiency across the same periods.

Document type: Resource Guide
Publication Date: October 2010
Page Focus: Compliance

The guide includes practical plan review and inspection resources, including the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program's REScheck™ and COMcheck™ quick reference guides, case studies, and sample inspection checklists; as well as excerpts from International Code Council's commentaries, workbooks, and code companion materials.

This collection also includes many other helpful items and points to further resources available on the web. Residential and commercial building officials can easily add state and local guidance in order to use this binder as a one-stop resource to support compliance in the field.

Document type: Other, Program Information, Reports and Studies
Publication Date: February 2010
Page Focus: Adoption, Code Development, Compliance

In order to provide a basic introduction to the varied and complex issues associated with building energy codes, the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program, with valued assistance from the International Codes Council and ASHRAE, has prepared Building Energy Codes 101: An Introduction. This guide is designed to speak to a broad audience with an interest in building energy efficiency, including state energy officials, architects, engineers, designers, and members of the public.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: August 2007
Page Focus: Compliance, Enforcement

A study funded by the North American Insulation Manufacturers Association to identify "the best practices in energy code support, compliance, and enforcement, and...[to promote and replicate] those best practices in other municipalities across Arizona."

Document type: Resource Guide
Publication Date: June 2011
Page Focus: Adoption, Code Development, Compliance

This guide provides key information to policy makers on energy codes and standards and offers guidance on how policy makers can support the creation of statewide energy efficiency goals and standards. In addition, this guide instructs policy makers on how they can:

  • Encourage the adoption of statewide codes.
  • Establish energy code awareness programs.
  • Support enforcement of and compliance with energy codes.
  • Participate in the development of model codes and standards.
  • Determine the viability of the new code.
Document type: Resource Guide
Publication Date: September 2011
Page Focus: Compliance

This guide provides key information on energy codes tailored for architects and provides guidance on how they can support the adoption of new or updated energy codes and the resources needed to ensure compliance with what is adopted. The guide also includes information on the importance of architects in the development and compliance verification processes; information on the interface between codes and the design process; design and compliance tools; information on building construction and commissioning, and many other resources that are key to helping architects understand the important role energy codes through the design process play in addressing our energy, economic and environmental challenges.

Document type: Other
Publication Date: April 2006
Page Focus: Adoption, Compliance

This document is to be used to guide the efforts associated with conducting evaluations of California’s energy efficiency programs and program portfolios launched after December 31, 2005, and includes the Codes and Standards Program Evaluation Protocol, which is designed to guide evaluation approaches for codes and standards programs.

Document type: Other
Publication Date:
Page Focus: Adoption, Compliance

This document presents a consistent, systemized, cyclic approach for planning and conducting evaluations of California's energy efficiency and resource acquisition programs, and provides valuable information concerning when evaluations should be conducted, the types of evaluation that can be conducted, and a discussion of approaches for conducting those studies.

Document type: Technical Support Document
Publication Date: October 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

You can use COMcheck™ to demonstrate that your commercial or high-rise residential building design complies with the ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007.

The COMcheck software provides a highly flexible way to demonstrate compliance with minimal input. The envelope section allows tradeoffs between envelope components, including roofs, walls, windows, floors, and skylights. The lighting section enables you to quickly determine if your lighting design meets interior-lighting power limits. The mechanical section enables you to assemble a customized list of code requirements that are applicable to the systems and equipment in your building.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: June 2011
Page Focus: Compliance

The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code requires openings in the building envelope to be sealed to prevent air leakage into and out of the space, including an air barrier at insulation installations.

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

A study that assessed the energy-related characteristics of over 160 buildings planned for construction in and after 2001 showed that the majority of newly constructed commercial buildings in the United States already meet or exceed ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1989 standard for envelope requirements.

Document type: Compliance Tool
Publication Date: June 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

In supporting state energy code compliance evaluations, the Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) has developed commercial data collection checklists. The checklists are available for use as paper checklists or electronic Microsoft Word® forms.

The BECP also developed an online tool, the Checklist Score + Store. While overall compliance can be determined manually for individual buildings and groups of renovations, this tool provides automated building scores and state-wide consolidation of data. Individual building scores will remain confidential (available only to the state and their contractors), but storing data nationally will shed valuable light on nationwide compliance, as well as changes in compliance over time.

Guidelines for using the checklists may be found in Measuring State Energy Code...

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 and the 2003 International Energy Conservation Code include requirements for interior and exterior lighting in new construction, additions, and alterations for all commercial buildings, including residential structures with four or more stories above grade.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: September 2011
Page Focus: Adoption, Compliance

Conformity assessment is a term used to describe the processes followed to demonstrate that a product, service, management system, or body meets specified requirements, such as standards, codes, laws, regulations, or other criteria. With respect to energy codes, conformity assessment includes all activities and tasks undertaken by any number of entities to ensure that the provisions of an adopted energy code are achieved at a designated point in time. This report identifies and discusses conformity assessment activities and provides guidance for developing new or adjusting existing ways of verifying compliance. In addition, this report looks at different ways to ensure that the energy efficiency goals of an adopted code or standard are achieved.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: April 2009
Page Focus: Adoption, Code Development, Compliance

At the request of the U.S. Department of Energy, the Joint Global Change Research Institute has prepared a series of reports surveying building energy codes in seven of the Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Energy and Climate (APP) countries. These reports include country reports on building energy codes in each APP partner country and a comparative report based on the country reports.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: August 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

A demand control ventilation (DCV) system is an integral part of a building’s ventilation design. It adjusts outside ventilation air based on the number of occupants and the ventilation demands that those occupants create

Document type: Brochures/Fliers, Program Information
Publication Date: July 2011
Page Focus: Adoption, Code Development, Compliance

As our country continues to focus on saving energy and reducing emissions in the face of global climate change, it is turning to the building sector for viable solutions. The effects of energy use in residential and commercial buildings are nationwide, worldwide and varied. In the U.S. alone, residential and commercial buildings account for 40% of all energy consumption and 70% of electricity usage.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: May 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

Duct insulation and sealing, especially insulated supply ducts delivering conditioned air within a building, save energy. The intent of energy efficiency codes, as related to duct insulation and sealing, is to keep mechanically warmed or cooled air as close to a constant, desired temperature as possible and prevent the conditioned air from escaping the duct system while it is being moved to spaces where it is needed. If reduced heat transfer through insulated ducts is accounted for in the heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) load calculations, it may even be possible to reduce the size of HVAC equipment.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: June 2011
Page Focus: Compliance

The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) requires cooling systems in commercial buildings to have economizers, depending on climate zone and cooling system capacity. Economizers save cooling system energy by using outdoor air to cool a building when outdoor conditions are favorable.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: July 2008
Page Focus: Compliance, Enforcement

This report was developed by Pennsylvania Housing Research Center (PHRC) in order to describe PHRC’s energy code technical assistance pilot program and to report the conclusions of the energy code enforcement and compliance study. The program focused on providing a technical assistance program and assessing “common energy enforcement and building practices” for several municipalities, COGs and third- party agencies that volunteered for the program.

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

This article provides details on the control, efficacy, and power density requirements for exterior lighting in ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 and the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code .

Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: September 2015
Page Focus: Compliance

In accordance with the provisions of Section 304 of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA), as amended under 42 U.S.C 6833(b)(2)(B)(i) and 42 U.S.C 6833 (a)(l), each state must file certification statements to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that it has reviewed the provisions of its building codes regarding energy efficiency and make a determination as to whether to update its code to meet or exceed the 2015 IECC, as well as ASHRAE 90.1-2013.

In 2010, the State of Hawaii adopted the 2006 IECC with amendments as the State Energy Conservation Code, referenced herein as the Hawaii Energy Code (HEC). The Hawaii State Energy Office has contracted with the Britt/Makela Group (BMG) team to provide analyses of proposed amendments to residential and commercial provisions of the 2015 IECC. The outcome of this analysis will be to facilitate adoption at the state and county level. In addition, the analysis provides a basis for the Hawaii State Energy Office to...

Document type: Resource Guide
Publication Date: September 2011
Page Focus: Compliance

Ensuring compliance with HVAC control requirements is difficult, as controls can be difficult to identify on plans or in the building, yet it is a crucial task. HVAC controls are a key driver of building performance and without compliance and enforcement activities, the code requirements may be ignored, overlooked, or misunderstood.

This guide provides an aid that will make it easier to apply the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) control requirements found in building energy codes and addresses requirements defined by 2009 and 2012 editions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010.

Document type: Analysis, Reports and Studies
Publication Date: March 2017
Page Focus: Adoption, Compliance

This study used a three-step process to evaluate the degree to which high-impact controls requirements included in commercial energy codes are realizing their savings potential. The three-step process included: (1) interviews of commissioning agents; (2) field audits of a sample of commercial buildings to determine how well control measures are being designed, commissioned and correctly implemented; and (3) analysis of the information gathered.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: March 2005
Page Focus: Compliance

This report assessed commercial building practices to the 2003 International Code Council International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). Plan review and field inspection of 55 new construction commercial buildings determined if the plans complied with the IECC, and if the building was built to the plans and code. Because an energy code had not previously been enforced, personnel were trained to conduct the onsite inspections and collect data on "typical" commercial construction. Compliance issues were identified and documented.

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

Insulation installed in a suspended ceiling does not meet the infiltration requirements of the International Energy Conservation Code. When the insulation is on the suspended ceiling, the ceiling is defined as part of the building envelope. This requires that it be air-sealed like any other envelope component.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: August 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

The intent of the pipe insulation requirements is to reduce temperature changes while fluids are being transported through piping associated with heating, cooling or service hot water (SHW) systems, thereby saving energy and reducing operating costs.

Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Compliance, Enforcement

This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: August 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

Kitchen and dining facilities use a large amount of energy per floor area. Kitchen exhaust hoods contribute greatly to that energy use. Energy is used both to operate fans and to heat and cool makeup air that is then exhausted.

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

Revisions and additions in the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2004 affect most new building designs. These requirements are mandatory and cannot be traded away, but options and exceptions are provided to meet the needs of various building and space types and activities. The requirements are categorized into two general areas: basic space control and automatic shutoff controls.

Document type: Resource Guide
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Adoption, Code Development, Compliance

This guide provides information for anyone dealing with a lighting energy code or standard. It provides background and development information to help readers understand the basis for requirements and their intent. The guide also provides detailed explanations of the major types of requirements such that users can more effectively design to meet compliance while applying the most flexibility possible.

Document type: Compliance Tool
Publication Date: October 2010
Page Focus: Compliance

This document contains a flier and letter templates for use by states.

Example:

Buildings account for roughly 40 percent of the nation’s energy consumption. Enhancing their efficiency will lead to a stronger economy, a cleaner environment, and decreased dependence on imported oil. With this goal in mind, the (state organization), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), is asking local jurisdictions to participate in a statewide study to measure compliance rates with building energy codes. This letter is meant to familiarize you with the study and to solicit your support for this important activity.

Document type: Compliance Tool, Reports and Studies
Publication Date: March 2010
Page Focus: Compliance

To supplement the Measuring State Energy Code Compliance report, this user-friendly action plan summarizes the main procedures, shows further options, and points to several ready-made resources and web-based tools U.S Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program is releasing to support the process.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: October 2011
Page Focus: Compliance

ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010 and the commercial provisions of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code require that the building envelope be carefully designed to limit uncontrolled air leakage into and out of the building.

Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Compliance, Enforcement

This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation ...

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The Building Energy Codes Program compliance tools -- COMcheck™, COMcheck-Web™, REScheck™, and REScheck-Web™ -- have the capability to upload and download files to and from the desktop and Web-based versions of the software you are using.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: June 2008
Page Focus: Compliance

This study looked at seven building measures in both the residential and nonresidential sectors to learn how closely actual building practices adhere to newly adopted codes. Data were collected by reviewing permits and conducting verification site visits for a sample of building projects throughout the state. Key findings from this study include quantitative estimates of noncompliance rates for the seven measures, as well as qualitative information about some unexpected complexities associated with data collection efforts around building practices, both at building departments (during permit review) and at building sites (during inspection).

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

ASHRAE Standard 90.1 and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC)have a long, intertwined history of development, starting with the original development of ASHRAE Standard 90-75 in direct response to the oil crisis in 1973, and continuing on to the latest documents.

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

This article discusses building energy simulation software appropriate for use with the Energy Cost Budget method in ASHRAE Standard 90.1 and the Total Building Performance section of the International Energy Conservation Code.

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

To have a building certified by the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), architects and designers can use several tools to demonstrate that the building complies with various sustainable design requirements. The USGBC certifies the building through the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating System. This is a voluntary, consensus-based performance rating system. This article discusses the software that may be used to verify compliance.

Document type: Compliance Tool
Publication Date: September 2010
Page Focus: Compliance, Residential

This document contains sample survey questions designed for use by states wishing to conduct a survey of their building jurisdictions as one method of better understanding energy code compliance rates in their state.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: May 2007
Page Focus: Adoption, Compliance

The goal of the study was twofold: 1) to refine the original estimates made of noncompliance, initial market penetration, and naturally occurring market adoption rates by researching and analyzing the factors contributing to each parameter; and 2) to test the 2006 California Energy Efficiency Evaluation Protocols (Evaluation Protocols) as it applies to determining net savings resulting from Program activities.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: July 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The appropriate treatment of task lighting for energy code compliance has always been a potentially confusing issue. The intent of ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 (as well as previous editions back to 1999) and the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) (including editions back to 2003) is for task lighting to be included in compliance calculations when it is part of the lighting design. This applies to office spaces where task lighting is common, as well as other spaces where task lighting may appear in various forms.

Document type: Technical Support Document
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

This technical support document (TSD) is designed to explain the technical basis for the COMcheck software as originally developed based on the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989). Documentation for other national model codes and standards and specific state energy codes supported in COMcheck has been added to this report as appendices. These appendices are intended to provide technical documentation for features specific to the supported codes and for any changes made for state-specific codes that differ from the standard features that support compliance with the national model codes and standards. Beginning with COMcheck version 3.8.0, support for 90.1-1989, 90.1-1999, and the 1998 IECC and version 3.9.0 support for 2000 and 2001 IECC are no longer included, but those sections remain in this document for reference purposes.

Document type: Technical Support Document
Publication Date: November 2006
Page Focus: Compliance

This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in small office buildings over levels contained in ASHRAE Standard 90.1- 1999. This the first in a series of guides being developed by a partnership of organizations, including ASHRAE, the American Institute of Architects, the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, the New Buildings Institute, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: April 2015
Page Focus: Compliance

The State of Tennessee, Department of Commerce and Insurance, Division of Fire Prevention, previously sent a letter, dated July 18, 2013, to the U.S., Department of Energy certifying that it had adopted the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for one and two family dwellings and townhouses and non-State owned commercial buildings, and the American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standard 90.1-2007 for State buildings.

In that letter, the State of Tennessee sought an extension until March 31, 2015, to review and consider adoption of updated editions of the IECC and ASHRAE standards to comply with the certification requirements of Section 304(C) of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act (EPCA).  However, due to the current political environment and coinciding circumstances, the State of Tennessee requests additional time, specifically December 1, 2015, in which to adopt the 2009 IECC and ASHRAE 90.1-2010.

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Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

ASHRAE modified its ventilation procedure to reflect more current data available on indoor air quality. The Standard was developed under American National Standards Institute guidelines and released in 2004: ASHRAE Standard 62.1-2004, Ventilation for Acceptable Indoor Air Quality.

Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Compliance, Enforcement

This Guide is designed to assist state and local code jurisdictions in achieving statewide compliance with the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for residential buildings and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 for commercial buildings.

Document type: Technical Articles
Publication Date: May 2009
Page Focus: Compliance

The primary intent behind the requirement for a vestibule is to reduce infiltration into a space that includes doors with high volume of pedestrian traffic. Vestibules reduce the infiltration losses (or gains) from wind and stack effect by creating an air lock entry.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: May 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

The intent of the vestibule requirement is to reduce infiltration of air into a space, thereby addressing energy conservation and comfort issues for occupants located near primary entrance doors. The majority of infiltration comes through primary entrance doors that are typically used to access public areas, and have higher usage rates than doors classified for personnel use. Vestibules can reduce the infiltration losses (or gains) from wind and stack effects by creating an air lock entry.