Publications

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Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: May 2014
Page Focus: Adoption, Code Development, Compliance, Residential

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory analyzed the relationship between the Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) Home Energy Rating System (HERS) Index and the traditional simulation-based Performance Path used in the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). The analysis evaluates, for a single-family residence with various characteristics, the ranges of HERS Index values that would imply compliance with the 2012 IECC Performance Path. Several building characteristics considered likely to result in quantifiable differences in the outcomes of the two approaches, or otherwise believed to be of interest to code developers and policy makers, are considered in the analysis.

Document type: Resource Guide
Publication Date: September 2011
Page Focus: Compliance

Ensuring compliance with HVAC control requirements is difficult, as controls can be difficult to identify on plans or in the building, yet it is a crucial task. HVAC controls are a key driver of building performance and without compliance and enforcement activities, the code requirements may be ignored, overlooked, or misunderstood.

This guide provides an aid that will make it easier to apply the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) control requirements found in building energy codes and addresses requirements defined by 2009 and 2012 editions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010.

Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: April 2012
Page Focus: Code Development

The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) prototype building models (prototype models) were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), to simulate energy savings associated with changes in energy codes and standards. For residential buildings, PNNL utilized two base prototypes to simulate both Single-family detached house, and Multi-family low-rise apartment building types. Energy models for the 2006, 2009 and 2012 versions of the IECC are available for each state.

Complete IECC Prototype Building Model packages include files for every state by IECC version.

Each ZIP file includes EnergyPlus model input files (.idf) and corresponding output files (.html).

Note: each of these files are over 100 MB in size; download times may vary.

Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: May 2012
Page Focus: Code Development

The International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) prototype building models (prototype models) were developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), in support of DOE's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), to simulate energy savings associated with changes in energy codes and standards. For residential buildings, PNNL utilized two base prototypes to simulate both Single-family detached house, and Multi-family low-rise apartment building types. Energy models for the 2006, 2009 and 2012 versions of the IECC are available for each state.

This set of IECC Prototype Building Models is for the state of Vermont, using a customized version of the 2009 IECC as the baseline code with better slab insulation and windows and tighter duct sealing.

Each ZIP file includes EnergyPlus model input files (.idf) and corresponding output files (.html).

Document type: Analysis
Publication Date: October 2016
Page Focus: Adoption, Compliance, Enforcement

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), funded by DOE, conducted an assessment of the prospective impacts of national model building energy codes from 2010 through 2040. A previous PNNL study evaluated the impact of the Building Energy Codes Program1; this study looked more broadly at overall code impacts. This report describes the methodology used for the assessment and presents the impacts in terms of energy savings, consumer cost savings, and reduced CO2 emissions at the state level and at aggregated levels.

Document type: Analysis, Reports and Studies
Publication Date: March 2017
Page Focus: Adoption, Compliance

This study used a three-step process to evaluate the degree to which high-impact controls requirements included in commercial energy codes are realizing their savings potential. The three-step process included: (1) interviews of commissioning agents; (2) field audits of a sample of commercial buildings to determine how well control measures are being designed, commissioned and correctly implemented; and (3) analysis of the information gathered.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: August 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

The intent of the pipe insulation requirements is to reduce temperature changes while fluids are being transported through piping associated with heating, cooling or service hot water (SHW) systems, thereby saving energy and reducing operating costs.

Document type: Code Notes
Publication Date: August 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

The intent of the pipe insulation requirements is to reduce temperature changes while fluids are being transported through piping associated with heating, cooling or service hot water (SHW) systems, thereby saving energy and reducing operating costs.

Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: October 2013
Page Focus: Adoption

Letter from the Kentucky Department of Housing, Buildings and Construction requesting a deadline to file Kentucky's certification statement with respect to ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010.

Document type: Resource Guide
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Adoption, Code Development, Compliance

This guide provides information for anyone dealing with a lighting energy code or standard. It provides background and development information to help readers understand the basis for requirements and their intent. The guide also provides detailed explanations of the major types of requirements such that users can more effectively design to meet compliance while applying the most flexibility possible.

Publication Date: July 2013
Page Focus: Adoption

The energycode for one- and two-family residential structures in Louisiana is Part IV: Energy Conservation of the 2006 IRC. 2009 IECC is currently being enforced in low-rise, multifamily residential structures. ASHRAE 90.1-2007 is currently enforced for commercial construction.

This letter certifies that ACT 390 of 2013 has been signed by the Governor, and it will update Part IV: Energy Conservation of the 2009 IRC effective January 1, 2014, and that ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 is the code  currently enforced by the Louisiana Office of the State Fire Marshal for commercial construction.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: September 2016
Page Focus: Residential

A research project in the state of Maryland investigated energy code-related aspects of residential single-family new construction. The study was initiated in January 2015 and continued through July 2015. During this period, research teams visited 207 homes during various stages of construction, resulting in a substantial data set based on observations made directly in the field. Analysis of the data has led to a better understanding of the energy features present in homes, and indicates over $1.5 million in potential savings to Maryland homeowners that could result from increased code compliance. Public and private entities within the state can use this information to justify and catalyze future investments in energy code training and related energy efficiency programs.

Document type: Compliance Tool
Publication Date: October 2010
Page Focus: Compliance

This document contains a flier and letter templates for use by states.

Example:

Buildings account for roughly 40 percent of the nation’s energy consumption. Enhancing their efficiency will lead to a stronger economy, a cleaner environment, and decreased dependence on imported oil. With this goal in mind, the (state organization), with support from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Building Energy Codes Program (BECP), is asking local jurisdictions to participate in a statewide study to measure compliance rates with building energy codes. This letter is meant to familiarize you with the study and to solicit your support for this important activity.

Document type: Compliance Tool, Reports and Studies
Publication Date: March 2010
Page Focus: Compliance

In this document, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program provides a detailed set of procedures that may help states as they engage in activities in support of code implementation and enforcement as well as measurement of the compliance rate associated with the codes and standards named in legislation, most notably those associated with measuring and reporting rates of compliance.

Document type: Compliance Tool, Reports and Studies
Publication Date: March 2010
Page Focus: Compliance

To supplement the Measuring State Energy Code Compliance report, this user-friendly action plan summarizes the main procedures, shows further options, and points to several ready-made resources and web-based tools U.S Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program is releasing to support the process.

Document type: Technical Support Document
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

This report explains the methodology used to develop Version 4.4.3 of the REScheck software developed for the 1992, 1993, and 1995 editions of the MEC, and the 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, and 2012 editions of the IECC, and the 2006 edition of the International Residential Code (IRC). Although some requirements contained in these codes have changed, the methodology used to develop the REScheck software for these editions is similar. Beginning with REScheck Version 4.4.0, support for 1992, 1993, and 1995 MEC and the 1998 IECC is no longer included, but those sections remain in this document for reference purposes.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: August 2015
Page Focus: Code Development, Residential

This document lays out the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) methodology for evaluating the cost-effectiveness of energy code and standard proposals and editions. The evaluation is applied to new provisions or editions of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1 and the International Energy Conservation Code. The methodology follows standard life-cycle cost (LCC) economic analysis procedures. Cost-effectiveness evaluation requires three steps: 1) evaluating the energy and energy cost savings of code changes, 2) evaluating the incremental and replacement costs related to the changes, and 3) determining the cost-effectiveness of energy code changes based on those costs and savings over time.

This document was originally published in January, 2015. Revision 1 was published in August, 2015, and is available at: commercial_methodology.pdf.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: April 2012
Page Focus: Code Development

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Building Energy Codes Program has developed and established a methodology for evaluating the energy and economic performance of residential energy codes. This methodology serves two primary purposes. First, as DOE participates in the consensus processes of the International Code Council, the methodology described herein will be used by DOE to ensure that its proposals are both energy efficient and cost effective. Second, when a new version of the International Energy Conservation Code is published, DOE will evaluate the new code as a whole to establish expected energy savings and cost effectiveness, which will help states and local jurisdictions interested in adopting the new codes. DOE's measure of cost-effectiveness balances longer-term energy savings against additions to initial costs through a life-cycle cost perspective.

2015 Revision to this document was posted August 12, 2015. This document is an update to the U...

Document type: Model Data
Publication Date: April 2011
Page Focus: Code Development

This speadsheet provides a summary of the percentage of energy savings with plug loads for the ASHRAE Standard 90.1 Prototype Building Models.

Document type: Analysis
Publication Date: June 2015
Page Focus: Code Development

This analysis focuses on one- and two-family dwellings, townhomes, and low-rise multifamily residential buildings based on the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC). PNNL evaluated the cost-effectiveness of the changes in the prescriptive and mandatory residential provisions of the 2015 edition of the IECC, hereafter referred to as the 2015 IECC, compared to those in the 2012 and 2009 IECC. The current analysis builds on the PNNL technical report titled 2015 IECC: Energy Savings Analysis (Mendon et al. 2015) which identified the prescriptive and mandatory changes introduced by the 2015 IECC compared to the 2012 IECC and determined their energy savings impact.

Document type: Comparison
Publication Date: July 2013
Page Focus: Regulatory

After a regulatory action has been issued, Section 6(a)(3)(E) of Executive Order (EO) 12866 requires agencies to identify in a complete, clear, and simple manner, the substantive changes between the draft submitted to The Office of Management and Budget's Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for review and the action subsequently announced, and identify those changes in the regulatory action that were made at the suggestion or recommendation of OIRA. This OMB compare document is intended to comply with this requirement.

Document type: Comparison
Publication Date: May 2012
Page Focus: Regulatory

After a regulatory action has been issued, Section 6(a)(3)(E) of Executive Order 12866 requires agencies to identify in a complete, clear, and simple manner, the substantive changes between the draft of the final determination submitted to The Office of Management and Budget's (OMB's) Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for review and this final determination, and identify those changes in this determination that were made at the suggestion or recommendation of OIRA. This OMB compare document is intended to comply with this requirement.

Document type: Comparison
Publication Date: May 2012
Page Focus: Regulatory

After a regulatory action has been issued, Section 6(a)(3)(E) of Executive Order 12866 requires agencies to identify in a complete, clear, and simple manner, the substantive changes between the draft submitted to Office of Management and Budget's (OMB's) Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) for review and the action subsequently announced, and identify those changes in the regulatory action that were made at the suggestion or recommendation of OIRA. This OMB compare document is intended to comply with this requirement.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: May 2017
Page Focus: Residential

A research project in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania identified opportunities to reduce homeowner utility bills in residential single-family new construction by increasing compliance with the state energy code. The study was initiated in October 2014 and continued through July 2015. During this period, research teams visited 171 homes during various stages of construction, resulting in a substantial data set based on observations made directly in the field. Analysis of the data has led to a better understanding of the energy features present in homes, and indicates over $2.7 million in potential annual savings to Pennsylvania homeowners that could result from increased compliance with the 2009 International Energy Conservation Code (and equivalent compliance options). Public and private entities within the state can use this information to justify and catalyze future investments in energy code training and related energy efficiency programs.

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Step-by-step instructions for using REScheck-Web.

Document type: Compliance Tool
Publication Date: June 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

In supporting state energy code compliance evaluations, the U.S. Department of Energy's Building Energy Codes Program (BECP) has developed residential data collection checklists. The checklists are available for use as paper checklists or electronic Microsoft® Word® forms.

Guidelines for using the following checklists to evaluate state energy code compliance can be found in Measuring State Energy Code Compliance, Section 6.0.

The BECP also developed an online tool, the Checklist Score + Store (no longer supported). While overall compliance can be determined manually for individual buildings and groups of renovations, this tool provides automated building scores and state-wide consolidation of data. Individual building scores will remain confidential (available only to the state and their contractors), but storing data nationally will shed valuable light on nationwide compliance,...

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: February 2007
Page Focus: Compliance

The primary goal of this paper was to review existing energy code evaluation studies, and make recommendations for future work in this area. The secondary purpose is to address this existing body of literature as it relates to the quantification of the savings gap, defined as the energy savings foregone due to non-compliance with the energy code adopted in a state or local jurisdiction.

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Forms available on the Residential Energy Code Field Study page.

Document type: Brochures/Fliers
Publication Date: August 2013
Page Focus:

Now in it’s second year, the Institute for Market Transformation will again recognize jurisdictions for exemplary work in achieving energy code compliance with the Standard Bearers: Excellence in Energy Code Compliance Award.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: January 2015
Page Focus: Adoption

The purpose of this analysis is to examine the cost-effectiveness of the 2013 edition of ANSI/ASHRAE/IES1 Standard 90.1 (ANSI/ASHRAE/IES 2013). PNNL analyzed the cost-effectiveness of changes in Standard 90.1 from 90.1-2010 to 90.1-2013, as applied in commercial buildings across the United States. During the development of new editions of Standard 90.1, the cost-effectiveness of individual changes (addenda) is often calculated to support the deliberations of ASHRAE Standard Standing Project Committee (SSPC) 90.1. The ASHRAE process, however, does not include analysis of the cost-effectiveness of the entire package of addenda from one edition of the standard to the next, which is of particular interest to adopting State and local governments. Providing States with an analysis of cost-effectiveness may encourage more rapid adoption of newer editions of energy codes based on Standard 90.1. This information may also inform the development of future editions of Standard 90.1.

Document type: Compliance Tool
Publication Date: September 2010
Page Focus: Compliance, Residential

This document contains sample survey questions designed for use by states wishing to conduct a survey of their building jurisdictions as one method of better understanding energy code compliance rates in their state.

Document type: Technical Support Document
Publication Date: September 2012
Page Focus: Compliance

This technical support document (TSD) is designed to explain the technical basis for the COMcheck software as originally developed based on the ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-1989 (Standard 90.1-1989). Documentation for other national model codes and standards and specific state energy codes supported in COMcheck has been added to this report as appendices. These appendices are intended to provide technical documentation for features specific to the supported codes and for any changes made for state-specific codes that differ from the standard features that support compliance with the national model codes and standards. Beginning with COMcheck version 3.8.0, support for 90.1-1989, 90.1-1999, and the 1998 IECC and version 3.9.0 support for 2000 and 2001 IECC are no longer included, but those sections remain in this document for reference purposes.

Document type: Technical Support Document
Publication Date: November 2006
Page Focus: Compliance

This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in small office buildings over levels contained in ASHRAE Standard 90.1- 1999. This the first in a series of guides being developed by a partnership of organizations, including ASHRAE, the American Institute of Architects, the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America, the New Buildings Institute, and the U.S. Department of Energy.

Document type: State-specific
Publication Date: July 2013
Page Focus: Adoption

The State of Tennessee, Department of Commerce and Insurance, Division of Fire Prevention certifies that it has adopted the 2006 International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) for one and two family dwellings and townhouses and non-State owned commercial buildings, and ASHRAE 90.1-2007 for State Buildings.

Document type: Reports and Studies
Publication Date: April 2017
Page Focus: Residential

A research project in the state of Texas identified opportunities to reduce homeowner utility bills in residential single-family new construction by increasing compliance with the state energy code. The study was initiated in October 2014; data collection began in March 2015, and continued through October 2015. During this period, research teams visited 133 homes in 30 counties in and around Houston during various stages of construction, resulting in a substantial data set based on observations made directly in the field. Stakeholders in the state agreed that these 30 counties represented the levels of energy codes and enforcement seen across the state. Analysis of the data has led to a better understanding of the energy features present in homes, and, when extrapolated across the entire state, indicates over $16 million in potential annual savings to Texas homeowners that could result from increased code compliance. Public and private entities within the state can use this...

Document type: Brochures/Fliers
Publication Date: October 2010
Page Focus: Adoption

The purpose of this brief is to provide a discussion related to amending or not amending model codes and standards when adopting them at the federal, state, or local level. It was considered necessary based on the significant amendment activity related to energy code adoption and the observation that in almost every case mistakes are made—some as significant as inadvertently excluding key building types from the code. In some cases, governing bodies will opt to amend with the goal of increasing energy savings; this is positive, and it is necessary to have states that are trendsetters with regard to efficiency. However, it is sometimes possible for amendment activities to yield the opposite result because of increased debate about the technical provisions and the “islanding” of jurisdictions with respect to the support infrastructure available for implementation and compliance with the model codes and standards.

Document type: Program Information
Publication Date: May 2011
Page Focus: Adoption

Today’s energy, economic, and environmental challenges—combined with the fact that buildings consume nearly 40% of the nation’s energy—make energy codes a central part of a sustainable future.
Here are 10 key reasons to adopt them.

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