Publications

This document attempts to answer the following questions: What is the potential value of increasing compliance with the energy code and which code requirements should be emphasized during these studies? Ultimately, these are the questions that policy makers, funders, and program implementers care about. To answer them, a far more sophisticated approach is needed, one that addresses not only the question of value, but also the resource requirements to determine that value.

A research project in the state of Oregon identified opportunities to reduce homeowner utility bills in residential single-family new construction by increasing compliance with the state energy code. The study was initiated in November 2019; data collection began in November 2019 and continued through February 2020. Analysis of the data has led to a better understanding of the energy features present in homes and identified over $600,000 in potential annual savings to Oregon homeowners that could result from increased compliance with the 2017 Oregon Residential Specialty Code (2017 ORSC).

Lighting materials for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2019 course

HVAC materials for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2019 course

Envelope materials for ANSI/ASHRAE/IES Standard 90.1-2019 course.

A research project in the Commonwealth of Virginia identified opportunities to reduce homeowner utility bills in residential single-family new construction by increasing compliance with the state energy code. The study was initiated in August 2017 and continued through May 2018. During this period, research teams visited 138 homes during various stages of construction, resulting in a substantial data set based on observations made directly in the field.

This file includes Phase III data collected for DOE's Residential Field Study.  Data is available for AL, GA, KY, MD, NC, PA, and TX.  No Phase III data was collected for Arkansas.  Data for Tennessee and Virginia was collected as a replacement for Arkansas Phase III, but that data will be made available in a separate file that includes other baseline data.

This is the data collected for states using DOE's Residential Field Study Methodology, but not part of DOE's Residential Field Study.  Data is currently available for ID, IL, MO, MT, NE, VA, and WV but additional data will be added as other states use the methodology.  

This guide provides information for anyone dealing with a lighting energy code or standard. It provides background and development information to help readers understand the basis for requirements and their intent. The guide also provides detailed explanations of the major types of requirements such that users can more effectively design to meet compliance while applying the most flexibility possible.

This guide provides an aid that will make it easier to apply the heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) control requirements found in building energy codes and addresses requirements defined by 2009 and 2012 editions of the International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 and ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2010.

This guide provides key information on energy codes tailored for architects and provides guidance on how they can support the adoption of new or updated energy codes and the resources needed to ensure compliance with what is adopted. The guide also includes information on the importance of architects in the development and compliance verification processes; information on the interface between codes and the design process; design and compliance tools; information on building construction and commissioning, and many other resources that are key to helping architects understand the important role energy codes through the design process play in addressing our energy, economic and environmental challenges.

This guide provides key information to policy makers on energy codes and standards and offers guidance on how policy makers can support the creation of statewide energy efficiency goals and standards. In addition, this guide instructs policy makers on how they can:

  • Encourage the adoption of statewide codes.
  • Establish energy code awareness programs.
  • Support enforcement of and compliance with energy codes.
  • Participate in the development of model codes and standards.
  • Determine the viability of the new code.

This guide includes practical plan review and inspection resources, including the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program's REScheck™ and COMcheck™ quick reference guides, case studies, and sample inspection checklists; as well as excerpts from International Code Council's commentaries, workbooks, and code companion materials.

This collection also includes many other helpful items and points to further resources available on the web. Residential and commercial building officials can easily add state and local guidance in order to use this binder as a one-stop resource to support compliance in the field.

This guide is a resource for understanding the air leakage requirements in the 2012 IECC and suggestions on how these measures can be met. It also provides information from Building America’s Air Sealing Guide, best Practices and case studies on homes that are currently meeting the provisions. The 2012 IECC and a few International Residential Code requirements are referenced throughout the guide.

Presentation slides that include overviews, planned revisions, and interrelationships among the following codes: ANSI/ASHRAE/IES 90.1-2010, ANSI/ASHRAE/IES/USGBC 189.1-2011, ICC 2012 IECC Commercial, ICC 2012 IgCC. 

The available presentation slides focus on the commercial scope and mechanical requirements of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code. The materials for this course were developed by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, and may be used for in-person training purposes. 

The available presentation slides focus on the commercial scope and mechanical requirements of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code. The materials for this course were developed by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, and may be used for in-person training purposes. 

The available presentation slides focus on the commercial scope and lighting requirements of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code. The materials for this course were developed by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, and may be used for in-person training purposes. Published July 2011.

The available presentation slides focus on the commercial scope and lighting requirements of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code. The materials for this course were developed by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, and may be used for in-person training purposes. 

The available presentation slides focus on the commercial scope and envelope requirements of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code. The materials for this course were developed by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, and may be used for in-person training purposes. 

The available presentation slides focus on the commercial scope and envelope requirements of the 2012 International Energy Conservation Code. The materials for this course were developed by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, and may be used for in-person training purposes. 

The available presentation slides focus on the commercial scope and mechanical requirements of the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code. The materials for this course were developed by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, and may be used for in-person training purposes.    

The available presentation slides focus on the commercial scope and mechanical requirements of the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code. The materials for this course were developed by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, and may be used for in-person training purposes.    

The available presentation slides focus on the commercial scope and lighting requirements of the 2015 International Energy Conservation Code. The materials for this course were developed by the DOE Building Energy Codes Program, and may be used for in-person training purposes.